Anti-Semitism tolerated by pro-Kremlin propaganda

Anti-Semitism tolerated by pro-Kremlin propaganda

 

Information security

«Most people know about, but few are willing to condemn, the strict taboo in the media, of criticizing Jews as a group, using that term. One cannot even criticize a small subsection of Jews, a miniscule percentage of the Jewish population, even when they richly deserve it.»

This and a whole series of similarly anti-Semitic statements were part of an editorial published on Monday in Moscow by the pro-Kremlin English language outlet, Russia Insider. The article, which ran under the headline “It’s Time to Drop the Jew Taboo,” attracted a wave of negative attention among observers of Russian media. How does it inscribe itself in the wider pro-Kremlin propaganda picture?

What is Russia Insider?

Russia Insider is a private, Moscow-based English language online media outlet, in which Western authors and commentators appear with criticism of Western governments and praise of the Kremlin. It presents itself as crowd-funded and run by a group of Western expats living in Russia who share a wish to make the Russian perspective on different issues available to audiences outside Russia. The author of the anti-Semitic piece is the outlet’s editor-in-chief, an American based in Moscow who appears as a commentator on RT (Russia Today).

Read also:  Moscow TV revives infamous anti-Semitic forgery ‘Protocols of the Elders of Zion’

In a leak analysed by academic Anton Shekhovtsov, author of the book Russia and the Western Far Right, it is claimed that the outlet could be sponsored by the Russian oligarch Konstantin Malofeev, who holds strongly nationalist views, allegedly sponsors rebels in Eastern Ukraine, and owns Russia’s largest nationalist media outlet, Tsargrad TV.

The Church and anti-Semitism in Russia

The Russian Orthodox Church is considered by many a strong source of nationalist sentiment in modern Russia; observers have seen the Church as central in building up an anti-Semitic narrative around the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution and the upcoming 100th anniversary of the execution of Russia’s last Imperial family. But also leading Russian politicians have publicly expressed anti-Semitic views. Former talk show host, now Duma Deputy Speaker Pyotr Tolstoy, was on the record with anti-Semitic statements a year ago. Similarly, news host and Secretary of the Russian Civic Chamber, Valery Fadeev, voiced anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, targeting French President Emmanuel Macron and his election campaign.

Endorsed by RT

Even if the anti-Semitic component in the propaganda is not initiated from the top of Russian authorities, but rather has its roots in some religious and other nationalist conservative circles, it is clearly tolerated by a government that normally does not shy away from trying to control the country’s information environment. Similarly, the systematic endorsement of the editor of an anti-Semitic outlet on the government’s international channel, RT, suggests that there is hardly more than an arm’s length between the two.


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Source: EU vs Disinfo

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  • Oknemfrod

    There’re quite a few Western expats dwelling in the cesspool called Russia and indulging in useful idiocy. It’s unclear what kind of motive has spurned them to move there – I suspect it’s mostly greed, a rabid anti-Western mental deviancy (not uncommon in the West), or merely an attractive body wrapped around an agreeable receptacle. What is clear, though, is that the sudden lovers of “russki mir” share strong masochistic proclivities akin to those needed to sleep on nails while philosophizing about the pleasure of doing so compared to resting on a Serta mattress. Some of them feel a strong urge to justify their stupidity in front of as wide audience as they can get – and Russia Insider gives them just the opportunity.

    What these poor saps don’t quite realize is that there’s nothing new about this kind of useful idiocy taken to extremes or what kind of fruit it eventually bears. There were plenty of like-minded idiots who came to the Soviet Union to help it build its “bright future”. Unfortunately for them, the hosts of the time were quite a bit more resolute than the current Russian rulers are thus far about what to do with those whose limit of useful idiocy had soon expired, and the refuse proceeded to learn the true meaning of the adage “there’s no unemployment in the USSR” in the system of full employment known as Gulag, where most of them expired in much fuller sense than that of their temporary utility as propagandists of the Soviet paradise.

    Their current followers, of course, are sure that nothing of the sort can happen to them nowadays. But if they had any brains left, they’d be able (especially living in Russia) to make some sober conclusions about the direction in which the cloaca on which they’re orating panegyrics has been going and get out the heck out of there while there’s still a chance.

    • Scradje

      In 1920 a delegation of socialists, including Bertrand Russell, went to meet Lenin and ‘investigate the effects of the revolution’. All except Russell returned and wrote glowingly of how wonderful this filthy murderer was doing. They were the original ‘useful idiots’ and their descendants today are joined by useful idiots of the far right in their groveling praise of the chekist rodent. These fascists of the far left/far right are united by their antisemitism and hatred of western democracy. Russell spent some time with Lenin and was surprised to find that he spoke decent English; sniggering about how he had successfully encouraged masses of poor peasants to murder farmers and landowners. Russell described Lenin as having ‘an impish cruelty’, which was something of an understatement. Despite knowing how evil the Bolsheviks were, he remained a socialist and ‘anti-imperialist’ (although obviously the term only applied to western democracies in his perverse view), even campaigning for unilateral nuclear disarmament. Despite hearing dissidents being shot during the night, he never quite could bring himself to condemn revolutionary Marxism. These people cannot be swayed whatever the evidence. Hence, arguing with any of the hordes of kremtrolls polluting western media with their toxic effluent is totally pointless.

      • Oknemfrod

        Said extremely relevantly and eloquently. Thanks!

      • Eddy Verhaeghe

        You are right that most zealots cannot be cured. For that we would need to see the destruction of the Russian Federation as we now know…
        But we should never stop exposing their falacies to the wider public, to limit the infection they are trying to spread.

    • Y K

      Not to contradict what you’re saying, but the likes of Bausman and his fellow Russia Insider degenerates (also to be found in outfits like Unz Review – which approvingly republished Bausman’s piece, – American Conservative, and more) have long crossed the line from being mere “useful idiots” to becoming full-time paid agents of the Putin regime. These creatures don’t deserve to be debated, but rather exposed for what they are and mercilessly hounded from polite society, to the extent that prosecuting them is impossible.

      • Oknemfrod

        Wholly agreed. Those who do this merely for the sake of dirty Russian moolah don’t quite deserve the moniker of “useful idiots”; they’ve just sold their souls to the Satan.

  • zorbatheturk

    To be pro-Putin is to be anti everything.

    • Y K

      Anti-everything you and I stand for, that’s for sure. It’s us or them: