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Two cargo ships arrive in Ukraine’s Chornomorsk port to load grain amid Russia’s blockade

First two cargo vessels, Resilient Africa and Aroyat, have reached Ukraine’s Chornomorsk port using a newly established corridor in the Black Sea amid Russia’s maritime blockade. They aim to load 20,000 tonnes of wheat for export to Egypt and Israel.
Ships grain corridor Black Sea
Ships await grain loading in Black Sea ports in July 2023. Photo: Ministry of Infrastructure
Two cargo ships arrive in Ukraine’s Chornomorsk port to load grain amid Russia’s blockade

On 16 September, two cargo vessels arrived in Ukraine, the first ships to use a temporary corridor to sail into Black Sea ports and load grain for African and Asian markets, Ukrainian port authorities said according to Reuters.

Ukraine’s Deputy PM Oleksandr Kubrakov said the ships – Resilient Africa and Aroyat – sailed flying the flag of the Oceanic island nation of Palau and that their crew consisted of people from Ukraine, Türkiye, Azerbaijan, and Egypt, according to BBC.

The vessels reached the port of Chornomorsk and were due to load 20,000 tonnes of wheat bound for Egypt and Israel, according to Ukraine’s Agricultural Ministry.

Another three ships leave Ukraine through Black Sea corridor amid Russia’s blockade

Last month, Ukraine unilaterally announced a “humanitarian corridor” in the Black Sea, aiming to free vessels stuck in its ports since Russia started its full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 and to bypass a de-facto blockade of Ukraine’s Black Sea ports by Russia.

So far, five ships managed to leave the port of Odesa using the corridor along the western Black Sea coast.

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