Copyright © 2024 Euromaidanpress.com

The work of Euromaidan Press is supported by the International Renaissance Foundation

When referencing our materials, please include an active hyperlink to the Euromaidan Press material and a maximum 500-character extract of the story. To reprint anything longer, written permission must be acquired from [email protected].

Privacy and Cookie Policies.

Is Moscow about to transform occupied Crimea into an Islamist enclave?

A heavily-protected Russian entry point into the Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea annexed by Russia in March 2014 (Image: Kommersant.ru)
A heavily-protected Russian entry point into the Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea annexed by Russia in March 2014 (Image: Kommersant.ru)
Is Moscow about to transform occupied Crimea into an Islamist enclave?
Edited by: A. N.

Even as the Russian occupation forces do everything they can to repress the Crimean Tatars, the most consistent opponents of Vladimir Putin’s Anschluss of their homeland, some in the Russian Duma are proposing to “open the peninsula to migrants from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan,” thereby creating Ruslan Gorevoy warns a radical Muslim enclave there.

If the Duma’s plans are realized, he says, the Muslim share of the population of the peninsula will more than double from 12 percent now to 25 percent in a few years, and those new arrivals will be introduce Islamist radicalism that will threaten Russian control from a new direction, the Versiya writer says.

Gorevoy does not address it, but Putin’s policies have already succeeded in transforming the Chechen national challenge from a specifically ethnic one to a much larger Muslim and even Islamist one, and so it seems entirely consistent that Moscow will again pursue a self-defeating policy in Crimea by attacking ethno-nationalism and thus allowing Islamism to spread.

The Duma deputies seem set on this course because the draft bill “on the legal status of foreign citizens in Russia” contains a provision which allows Uzbeks and Tajiks who are distant relatives of deported Crimean Tatars to gain Russian citizenship without going through the checks that Moscow now insists upon for others from those Central Asian countries.

Not only have the Duma deputies failed to focus on this opening to Islamist groups, Gorevoy continues, but they appear oblivious to the fact that this segment of the proposed law in fact reflects the ideas of some but far from all Crimean Tatar nationalists in the 1990s that to become a national republic, they must take in more Muslims and not just Crimean Tatars.


 

Edited by: A. N.
You could close this page. Or you could join our community and help us produce more materials like this.  We keep our reporting open and accessible to everyone because we believe in the power of free information. This is why our small, cost-effective team depends on the support of readers like you to bring deliver timely news, quality analysis, and on-the-ground reports about Russia's war against Ukraine and Ukraine's struggle to build a democratic society. A little bit goes a long way: for as little as the cost of one cup of coffee a month, you can help build bridges between Ukraine and the rest of the world, plus become a co-creator and vote for topics we should cover next. Become a patron or see other ways to support. Become a Patron!

To suggest a correction or clarification, write to us here

You can also highlight the text and press Ctrl + Enter

Please leave your suggestions or corrections here


    Euromaidan Press

    We are an independent media outlet that relies solely on advertising revenue to sustain itself. We do not endorse or promote any products or services for financial gain. Therefore, we kindly ask for your support by disabling your ad blocker. Your assistance helps us continue providing quality content. Thank you!

    Related Posts