Sarkozy: Russia should lift EU sanctions, Ukraine must not be allowed into NATO

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2016/06/17 - 12:49 • News, Politics, Russia, Ukraine

Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy urged Russia to lift sanctions against EU countries and spoke against Ukraine’s integration into NATO and the EU.

Sarkozy was invited to speak at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) on June 16.

“I’m one of many who believes that all sanctions should be lifted. We have enough problems as it is! We’ve suffered enough, and the strongest nations should reach out first. When I say the “strongest”, I’m referring to Russia and President Putin, of course.”

Putin and Sarkozy had an informal meeting on June 15.

“I asked President Putin to lift the sanctions on his part, and Minsk-2 will be applied in exchange. Let’s not allow the sanctions issue to block the state of affairs; let’s create favourable conditions and lift the sanctions on both sides. I hope Mr. Putin will announce the lifting of sanctions on his part, and we Europeans will follow suit.” 

Sarkozy said he planned to discuss the extension of anti-Russian sanctions with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in the near future.

“I’ll tell him how cautious we should be in extending sanctions against Russia.”

He also added that it would be a big mistake to accept Ukraine into NATO.

“Ukraine cannot choose who it wants as a partner. Ukraine is friends with Russia, and should also be a friend of Europe. That’s why I’ve always believed it would be wrong to integrate Ukraine into NATO and the European Union.”

Sarkozy remarked that he has a strategic plan on this issue, which he intends to announce later.

He insisted on his great friendship with Putin, pointing out several times that the Cold War was over and the West should turn the page and move forward.

Video of Sarkozy’s intervention at SPIEF (in French, one hour)

Sarkozy: Russia should lift EU sanctions, Ukraine must not be allowed to NATO


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Translated by: Christine Chraibi
Source: Ukrayinska Pravda

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  • Terry Washington

    And of course who cares about the Ukrainians eh- to quote Neville Chamberlain on the Czechs- “just a far off people of whom we know little!”

    • laker48

      Sad, but Sarkozy is just nobody in French politics.

      • Quartermaster

        Let’s hope it remains that way.

    • Alex George

      A good analogy. Or even better, Sarkozy the Quisling, cozying up to Putin the fascist.

      Those French who fought against fascism in WWII would spit on Sarkozy.

  • Scradje

    The sniveling traitor sarko is further proof that the long history of French collaboration with fascists is continuing just as before.

    • Oknemfrod

      I guess that’s the extent of French courtesy to thank the Ukrainians for fighting for France:

      http://forum.ottawa-litopys.org/france/sorobey.htm

      To quote: “During the summer of 1944, in little more than 100 days, two battalions of impressed Ukrainians went from being Waffen-SS grenadiers to heroes of the French Resistance who would be awarded a Legion d’Honneur and four Croix de Guerre… The Ukrainians’ defection brought the FFI more than 1,200 trained, motivated fighting men and a staggering amount of desperately needed weapons and equipment… Many of the Ukrainians in the Foreign Legion [who joined it post-war] served on with distinction in France’s colonial wars in North Africa and Indochina. Although their battles against their former German masters have been forgotten by most of the world since the end of World War II, their contribution to French liberation is still remembered by the citizens of the small villages around the Belfort Gap.”

      I wonder how many French have returned the favor by fighting the hitlerites and stalinists alike alongside the UPA or at least how many would be able to remind their own dwarf what the terms “honor” and “gratitude” mean.

      • Scradje

        Spot on oknemfrod. As usual.

        • Oknemfrod

          Thanks.

    • Sven Plantin

      As long

      • Alex George

        What person on this thread has suggested WWII is continuing? And no, Ukraine does not have to worry about Russian propaganda – Ukraine was part of the USSR which defeated Nazzi Germany. Russia did no more than that.

        France is not an ally of Ukraine, so don’t try and pretend it is. France is a collaborationist nation that has been doing its best to white-any EU policy for two years now, in its effort to cozy up to the fascist regime in the Kremlin.

        Also, learn what UPA was before attempting to write about it.

        • laker48

          Most French welcome Nazi Germans in Paris in 1940, too. French tanks used to have four to five reverse gears and only one forward in case they’re attacked from behind.
          An ad from a French newspaper: “Military rifle for sale! Never used and only once thrown to the ground.”
          http://a.disquscdn.com/uploads/mediaembed/images/1602/7276/original.jpg

      • Scradje

        I suggest you read oknemfrod’s post on this topic on this thread and have another think.

        • laker48
          • Scradje

            I read both articles; the second one was almost unbearable. To have suffered from not one, but two totalitarian fascist regimes back-to-back, is unbelievable bad luck, to put it mildly. Russian propaganda is as despicable now as it always was. Always committing appalling atrocities and always seeking to pass the blame onto someone else. Vile.

          • laker48

            Ukraine, even its western part, is far from homogeneous and those reports are well-documented and rather truthful. They’re also corroborated by professor Norman Davies in his works. He’s an objective historian paying tribute to close to 10 million Ukrainian casualties of WW2, but he also outlines in great statistical detail Ukrainian war crimes committed by Ukrainian nationalists fighting in the ranks of the SS and other Nazi German formations.

          • Scradje

            Firstly, Russia was a nazi collaborator nation and committed terrible atrocities when it invaded Poland in concert with Hitler. Secondly, as the DM article mentions, the nazi collaborators in W. Ukraine were actually Russians. Yes there were some Ukrainian collaborators too, but far more on the Russian side. No excuses whatsoever for anyone collaborating with the nazis’ bestial crimes against Ukrainian Jews. But there should be some sympathy for the Banderites, since their families had actually experienced the holodomor, which was deliberate genocide by the occupying power.

          • laker48

            “But there should be some sympathy for the Banderites, since their families had actually experienced the holodomor, which was deliberate genocide by the occupying power.”
            The Bandera movement originated in western Ukraine that was part of the Republic of Poland between 1919 and 1939 and has never experienced any kind of “Holodomor” or any famine at all. It was the Soviet Republic of Ukraine that was depopulated by the Stalin-created famine called the “Holodomor” (the Great Famine) in the winter of 1934/1935 and subsequently colonised by RuSSian-sent Bolsheviks.

          • Scradje

            Bandera was very well aware of the holodomor and undoubtedly many of his supporters were directly affected. They quickly recognised it for what it was: a form of genocide intended to destroy the Ukrainian nation.

          • laker48

            Bandera is still a more divisive than uniting figure in Ukraine and a bone of contention between its western and eastern parts. Increasingly more Ukrainians quietly walk away from Bandera and look for another national hero acceptable for both parts of their still deeply divided homeland. Bandera is also a major trump card in the hands of RuSSian propaganda.

          • Scradje

            ‘Their still deeply divided homeland’.
            A terribly misguided statement. Careful, you are slipping into kremprop territory. There are no Ukrainians fighting against Ukrainians, no ‘civil war’, only an invasion by a foreign fascist power. There are only 17.5% ethnic Russians in Ukraine and only a tiny minority within that minority identify as ‘pro-Russia’. Many of the volunteer battalions formed to stop the invader from stealing even more land contain large numbers of ethnic Russians, as do the regular Ukrainian armed forces. There are large cities in the south and east with above average ethnic Russian populations and to the disappointment of the fascist murder gang in the Kremlin, they have proved to be overwhelmingly loyal to Ukraine.

          • laker48

            I was in Ukraine many times since the early 1960s, travelled extensively between 1979 and 1981 when working as a liaison officer for a US company involved in the construction of the Orenburg gas pipeline, and was there the most recently in the fall of 2008.

            Only western Ukraine was Bandera-positive, Kyiv and Kharkiv were Bandera-neutral, Dnipro, Odessa and Zaporizhia openly anti-Bandera and Donbas was all the time ruled by the mafia (zhulya) that didn’t care about anything but crime and money.

            Not too much changed between 1980 and 2008, so it’s safe to say that the statistical distribution of Bandera worshippers and haters throughout Ukraine is still roughly the same. Needless to mention that corruption was rampant throughout the whole country.

            All that mosaic of folklore notwithstanding, I strongly believe that Ukraine, Crimea including, should be left to Ukrainians to hold a dialogue and govern themselves. Only Ukrainians have the right to clean their own mess, and RuSSia has no business there.

          • Scradje

            ‘Russia has no business there’ Too right laker. It has no business trying to demonise people from Ukrainian history, especially as its own history is filled with grisly monsters, from Ivan the terrible, Lenin, Stalin and now the miniature chekist dwarf, who is a skilled liar and embezzler, on top of the usual ‘accomplishments’ expected of Russian tyrants.
            ‘Ukrainians have the right to clean up their own mess’. Well yes, but all this ‘mess’, including corruption problems, is the direct result of centuries of Russian occupation. Once the enemy has been finally and irrevocably driven out, Ukraine will do just fine.

          • laker48

            Ukraine is not alone. Just take a look at what’s been going on in Poland since the Law and Justice party (PiS) took power in October last year. After the national audit of all government institutions that ended less than a month ago, over 100 reports to the prosecutors have been filed against former government officials, The most serious ones being about documented suspicions of collaboration with foreign intelligence, namely the RuSSian FSB. The post-Soviet corruption is everywhere in the former Soviet sphere of influence. It’s also ubiquitous in the West, especially in Germany and the Benelux states where mainly Gazprom-financed FSB agents corrupt politicians in Berlin and Brussels.

            Back in 1992, independent Ukraine started with a clean slot as an independent state, recognised as one by its neighbour Poland and, across the ocean, Canada as the first states on the globe just eight hours apart. Other UN member states followed suit. Needless to add that Ukraine’s GDP per capita was then a tad higher than Poland’s. There’s no excuse for doing nothing, as the Yeltsin RuSSia was weak and Ukraine could have followed the bumpy road of reforming itself.

            While other former Soviet European republics and block states started pursuing the road of painful reforms, the festival of grand theft, larceny and lawlessness went on throughout free Ukraine. Was that all RuSSia’s fault. The Donbas and other criminal gangs were roaming the country unpunished and the oligarchs were looting it mercilessly. Was that RuSSia’s fault again?

            I do oppose RuSSia’s criminal annexation of Crimea in its covert occupation of the SE part of Donbas, but try to look themselves in the eye. RuSSia and its Fuhrer Shorty the Shirtless, as all cowardly bullies and predators, is an opportunist and attacks only weak victims. It lost its first Chechen war and only the second one, triggered by a series of FSB-arranged bombings of apartment buildings throughout RuSSia, brought the Dwarf the first, basically Pyrrhic victory.

            Wasn’t that the best time for Ukraine, between those two Chechen wars, to demarcate and legally mark on the ground its border with RuSSia and start guarding it? Didn’t the Yatsenyuk government have to relocate 100% of all Ukrainian border guards from the Ukrainian-RuSSian border because everyone of them had smugglers i their families?

            Nothing was done and all oligarchs did business with RuSSia hand over fistt. Yulia Tymoshenko did deserve her jail term for what she had stolen from the Ukrainian people. Was that RuSSia’s fault a well? Please, give me a break and stop whining instead of cleaning your own mess! Nobody else will do it for you.

          • Scradje

            I totally agree with your analysis. I don’t care much for the abuse at the end though. I don’t agree with your conclusions either. Independent Ukraine did not start with a clean slate in 1992, simply because the former imperial power still had its infected claws dug into it, poisoning its bloodstream. Only now that Ukraine has a functioning democracy can it pull away from its hellish neighbour. But it still needs to evict it from its land. To do that, it does need help. If Ukraine and Georgia had been in Nato like Pribaltika, they would never have been invaded, simple as that. If US/UK had honoured their Budapest obligations and taken decisive action in early 2014, RuSSia would not still be inflicting death and misery upon Ukraine.

          • laker48

            Well, bygone is bygone. Ukraine faces its last chance to become a modern, democratic state and nation. Perhaps its current predicament is a blessing in disguise, as it has helped the nation to consolidate and re-invent itself. In the final account, it may become obvious that the present EU is not necessarily the best solution for Ukraine, as the Brussel bureaucracy is inadvertently leading the Union to self-destruction. Sad, but true. We may see a lot of regional activity in the nearest future and the present Ukrainian government will have to closely follow the action in order to stay its course and not be left out in the cold.

          • Scradje

            It is the Ukranians, who at terrible cost, finally forced the tinpot tyrant to reveal to the world what most of us knew all along; that modern Russia is an old fashioned fascist imperial power. Personally I would prefer Ukraine in Nato and outside the EU, but its people undoubtedly want the EU. So be it.

          • laker48

            It’s been obvious since the first Chechen war. When the former Soviet republics, now the Baltic States, and all former Soviet bloc countries scrambled to join NATO and the EU, the Ukrainians, Moldovans and Georgians were busy looting their homelands. Georgia was blessed with Mr. Saakashvili who managed to root out corruption there, while the Moldovans and Ukrainians were “blessed” with crooked leaders.

            The last warning Ukrainian president Yushchenko witnessed in person, courtesy of the late president of Poland Lech Kaczynski, was the RuSSian invasion of Georgia in August 2008. The Ukrainians elected Donbas mafia boss Viktor Yanukovych instead of sticking to a less corrupt crew. Sorry to rain on your parade, but you’re reaping what you sowed. You’re not the fastest learners in the former Soviet sphere of influence.

          • laker48

            I don’t polemicise with emotionally unstable idiots.

      • Oknemfrod

        >ukrainian behaviour during WWII<

        Elaborate on this one, if you please, particularly if you mean it in a negative sense.

  • Cruise Around

    …and for his non support of Ukraine, I wish the terrorists to annialate Paris and the French! All is fair in stupidly and war!

  • Sven Plantin

    I dont give a shit about what mr Sarkozy said and be aware that he is not representative of french public opinion. He is a political dwarf who was once president of France but he will never be again.

    • Alex George

      Sure, Sarkozy is not representative of French public opinion, nor is Ayrault who has been backstabbing Ukraine in the Normandy talks, nor Hollande who has been doing his best to drag Ukraine down. None of them are representative of French opinion…. Pull the other one – it has bells on.

  • Murf

    Define “Useful Idiot” in one word;
    Sarkozy.

    • laker48

      He’s not a useful idiot; he’s a conceited French bastard.

      • Murf

        You got me there.

        • laker48

          LOL!

  • laker48

    Two dwarfs with big egos.

  • Dirk Smith

    The usual narrative from old diplomats who then become neo-fascist oligarchs. (ie; Schroeder, Berlusconi, Blatter, Ecclestone, etc.) An antique like the KGB dinosaur currently destroying ruSSia-AGAIN. I’m sure this bought him a weekend in Sochi with hookers, etc.

  • Vlad Pufagtinenko

    Has Sarkozy stopped banging 14 year olds, long enough to say something? Who knew?

  • laker48

    This is one of the reasons why the Ukrainian army hasn’t received Javelin and Spike anti-tank missiles and other advanced western weapons. BTW, the ongoing, almost concluded by the new government national audit in Poland has already led to quiet arrests of several top military brass figures presumably for corruption, but rumors are circulating about their cooperation with the RuSSian FSB.

    The RuSSian FSB has spread around the world as malicious cancer since 1989, when Gorbachev facing the collapse of the Soviet Union officially disbanded part of the KGB and sent the most efficient agents throughout the globe with wads of cash and the task to dismantle western democracies. Hitler did the same at the end of 1944 with his Abwehr agents.