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Financial Times: EU estimates Ukraine entitled to over USD 195 billion after accession

The Council of the EU illuminated with the Ukrainian flag on Europe Day in Brussels in 2022. Image by European Union.
Financial Times: EU estimates Ukraine entitled to over USD 195 billion after accession

Ukraine’s membership in the EU would entitle Kyiv to over $195 billion during seven years from the union’s common budget, according to internal estimates, the Financial Times reported.

As per the General Secretariat of the Council, the body representing the governments of the 27 EU member states, the accession of nine new members, including Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, and six western Balkan states will increase the EU budget by 21% to $1, 54 trillion.

According to current EU rules, Ukraine will receive $99,7 billion under the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over seven years and $64 billion from EU cohesion funds used to improve infrastructure in the poorest EU member states.

Ukraine’s impact on the EU’s agricultural subsidy regime would be the most significant. The country would become the bloc’s largest recipient, with 41.1 mn hectares of utilized agricultural area, pushing France into second place.

Meanwhile, the European Commission planned to recommend launching Ukraine’s accession process to the EU in October.

Bloomberg: European Commission to recommend launching Ukraine’s EU accession process

Member states will discuss the commission’s recommendation in December. In case of agreement between the EU leaders, accession talks with Ukraine will begin.

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