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Ukraine intel says Russia delaying new mobilization amid stepped-up offensive – WSJ

Soldiers Russian mobilization
Mobilized Russians. File photo: TASS

Deputy head of Ukraine’s military intelligence Maj. Gen. Vadym Skibitskyi told WSJ that Russia was ready to launch a new mobilization wave but was struggling to integrate troops it had already drafted and was waiting to gauge the success of a stepped-up offensive ahead of the first anniversary of its invasion later this month.

Skibitskyi said that even if Russia forges ahead with a new round of mobilization, it will likely suffer from the same issues the previous wave brought to light, including shortages of modern equipment in good working order and a sufficient number of officers capable of preparing the vast influx of untrained men, WSJ reported.

“They’re preparing for a second wave of mobilization, but our assessment is that they’ll hold off because they haven’t overcome all the difficulties they experienced during the first wave,” he said. “They were not ready for such a large-scale mobilization at the time, and they aren’t now.”

Russia has mobilized “much more” than 300,000 troops and plans an offensive in February — Ukraine’s defense minister

Read also:

Past two weeks likely saw Russia’s highest casualties rate since all-out war’s first week – British intel

Russian debacle near Vuhledar demonstrates systemic poor training – ISW

Russia’s offensive has begun in Luhansk Oblast – ISW

 

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