Copyright © 2021 Euromaidanpress.com

The work of Euromaidan Press is supported by the International Renaissance Foundation

When referencing our materials, please include an active hyperlink to the Euromaidan Press material and a maximum 500-character extract of the story. To reprint anything longer, written permission must be acquired from [email protected].

Privacy and Cookie Policies.

Intel: Ukrainian cyberattack cripples Russian drone control system

Russian troops lost manual override for DJI drones after Ukrainian cyberattacks crashed key servers linked to custom friend-or-foe recognition software.
Russian soldier with a drone.
Russian soldier with a drone. Credit: RIA Novosti

Russian forces encountered widespread failures in drone control software following a successful cyber operation by the Ukrainian intelligence service, Ukraine’s Main Intelligence Directorate (GUR) announced on 8 February.

“Cyber specialists of the Chief Intelligence Directorate of the Ministry of Defense of Ukraine carried out another successful operation against the Russian occupiers – as of 8 February 2024, the enemy complains about massive drone control software failures,” GUR wrote on the Telegram channel.

Russian forces use the software to reflash DJI brand drones for combat operations. The program enables drone operators to configure and create new control panels, capture video and transmit footage to command centers, and control drones from a computer instead of a remote control, among other capabilities.

Through web servers, the Russian drone reflashing project provides friend-or-foe identification functionality. Per preliminary data, Ukraine’s military intelligence cyberattack took the servers offline, causing all software to register as “foe” and denying Russian access.

Without server access and thus no access to the system, drone control via remotes is likely impossible, Ukraine’s intel said. The Russian troops are now desperately trying to resolve the issue, including by switching to manual control modes, the intel added.

On 30 January, a Ukrainian cyber operation halted the information exchange between the Russian Ministry of Defense units using the Moscow-based server.

Read also:

You could close this page. Or you could join our community and help us produce more materials like this.  We keep our reporting open and accessible to everyone because we believe in the power of free information. This is why our small, cost-effective team depends on the support of readers like you to bring deliver timely news, quality analysis, and on-the-ground reports about Russia's war against Ukraine and Ukraine's struggle to build a democratic society. A little bit goes a long way: for as little as the cost of one cup of coffee a month, you can help build bridges between Ukraine and the rest of the world, plus become a co-creator and vote for topics we should cover next. Become a patron or see other ways to support. Become a Patron!
Total
0
Shares
Related Posts