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Voice of America: Ukraine dismantles Soviet-era monuments to break away from Russian past

Municipal workers take down a monument to Mykola Schors, a Soviet field commander during the Russian Civil War, in Kyiv, Ukraine, Dec. 9, 2023. Source: Kyiv City State Administration

On 9 December, municipal workers in Kyiv took down a monument of a Red Army commander Mykola Shchors from a central street as part of a campaign to remove Soviet-era monuments from Ukraine amid the Russian war, Voice of America has reported.

The statue of Shchors, a Soviet field commander during the Russian Civil War, was erected in the 1950s. City officials said the statue would be stored in a museum.

“Over 60 monuments related to the history and culture of Russia and the USSR have already been removed from the capital. Recently, the monument to Alexander Pushkin was dismantled,” the Kyiv City Council wrote on Telegram. 

Commenting on the move, Mykhailo Budilov, the director of the city’s Department of Territorial Control, said Ukraine continues derussification and decommunization to break ties with the Russian past.

Last year, the city of Dnipro had dismantled a bust of Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin and Soviet pioneer Volodia Dubinin.

Monument to Russian poet Pushkin taken down in central-Ukrainian Dnipro

Monuments to Pushkin have been removed in Kyiv, Kharkiv, Chernivtsi, Zhytomyr, Zaporizhzhia, Chernihiv, and other cities and towns.

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