Copyright © 2021 Euromaidanpress.com

The work of Euromaidan Press is supported by the International Renaissance Foundation

When referencing our materials, please include an active hyperlink to the Euromaidan Press material and a maximum 500-character extract of the story. To reprint anything longer, written permission must be acquired from [email protected].

Privacy and Cookie Policies.

Ukrainian IT Army paralyzes Russian telecom in occupied territories

“The fight in cyberspace continues. The IT Army is building strength and preparing for upcoming operations,” Ukraine’s Digital Minister Fedorov said.
Credit: Ukraine’s Digital Transformation Ministry
Ukrainian IT Army paralyzes Russian telecom in occupied territories

Ukrainian hackers from IT Army project have taken down the largest telecom operators and internet providers in Russian-occupied territories, Ukraine’s Minister of Digital Transformation Mykhailo Fedorov reported on 27 October.

Fedorov said the cyberattack targeted Crimea’s Krymtelekom, Miranda Media, and MirTelekom.

“The fight in cyberspace continues. The IT Army is building strength and preparing for upcoming operations,” Fedorov said.

Communications of Russia’s occupying forces in Crimea and parts of Kherson, Zaporizhzhia, Donetsk, and Luhansk oblasts are now partially paralyzed, the minister noted.

Ukraine’s IT Army is a volunteer hacker collective that emerged after Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine. It uses digital channels to spread information about Russia’s brutality to Russians and disrupt Russian systems.

Bloomberg: Russia steps up cyberattacks to disrupt Ukraine’s key services

In January 2023, the cyber defenders hacked Gazprom’s archive and gained access to 6,000 files.

In September 2022, the IT Army paralyzed over 4,000 Russian online resources in just two weeks, including the Wagner PMC website and Russia’s Gosuslugi public services portal.

On 5 October, Fedorov reported that Ukraine’s IT Army had hacked Russia’s Leonardo airline booking system, causing major disruptions at the country’s largest airports.

Read also:

You could close this page. Or you could join our community and help us produce more materials like this.  We keep our reporting open and accessible to everyone because we believe in the power of free information. This is why our small, cost-effective team depends on the support of readers like you to bring deliver timely news, quality analysis, and on-the-ground reports about Russia's war against Ukraine and Ukraine's struggle to build a democratic society. A little bit goes a long way: for as little as the cost of one cup of coffee a month, you can help build bridges between Ukraine and the rest of the world, plus become a co-creator and vote for topics we should cover next. Become a patron or see other ways to support. Become a Patron!

To suggest a correction or clarification, write to us here

You can also highlight the text and press Ctrl + Enter

Please leave your suggestions or corrections here


    Related Posts