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UK Intel: Russian soldiers get 2,7 more than Russia’s national average salary

Salary perks lure Russians to join invasion of Ukraine with privates promised 195,000 rubles (about $2040) monthly; while junior ranks serving in Ukraine get over 200,000 rubles (about $2100) per month, equating to 2.7 times the average salary in Russia.
Russian soldiers walking along a street in Mariupol on 12 April 2022. Photo: Alexander Nemenov/AFP
UK Intel: Russian soldiers get 2,7 more than Russia’s national average salary

Russia is enticing its citizens to join the invasion of Ukraine with lucrative monthly salaries, UK Intel reports.

According to British Intel, since the invasion, military service in the Russian Armed Forces has become “increasingly lucrative.”

“On 4 February 2022, Russian President Vladimir Putin noted that a lieutenant received 81,200 rubles (about $850) per month. By October 2022, he announced that even mobilised private soldiers would receive 195,000 rubles (about $2040) per month.”

As per UK Intel, junior ranks serving in Ukraine get over 2,7 times more than the Russian national average salary of 72,851 rubles (about $760). By way of comparison, 2.7 times the average UK salary would equate to over 90,000 pounds (about $ 113,400) a year.

“It is highly likely the salary and additional benefits are a strong incentive for personnel to join up, especially to those from the poorer areas of Russia. However, Russia is still unlikely to meet its targets for recruiting volunteers to the ranks,” British Intelligence concluded.

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