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Russia prepares next massive missile attack on Ukraine – Ukrainian intel

On average, it takes Russia about two weeks to prepare for the strikes, but Russia may launch a new massive attack on Ukraine earlier than January 9-10, representative of Ukraine’s Main Directorate of Intelligence Vadym Skibitskyi told RBC-Ukraine.

“Preparation is a complex process. This includes the selection of targets, the conduct of reconnaissance, additional reconnaissance, the preparation of missiles, crews, aircraft that will carry out the attack, and other issues related to coordination. Additionally, drones are also used for conducting reconnaissance, and combat carrier aircraft. And after striking, it is necessary to conduct reconnaissance again, clarify what the results are, etc. Therefore, a week or two is the average interval between the use of missile weapons,” he said.

Regarding the date of the next attack, he noted:

“It will depend on how many missiles they are going to use, how many they have ready for today. We can see that now aviation is training, flying from one airfield to another, yesterday there was a training of crews to carry out strikes. So the process of preparing for the next attack is ongoing,” he says.

The next massive missile attack on Ukraine may be on Orthodox Christmas, 6-7 January, Operational Command South spokesperson Nataliia Humeniuk said on the national telethon.

“According to our estimates, they [Russia] can now produce approximately 30 units of Kh-101 per month. Speaking of Kalibr, we think [they produce] 15-20 units per month,” Skibitskyi told RBC-Ukraine. According to him, the Russians also have old Kh-22 missiles, of which approximately 160 units remain.

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