Ukrainian students and activists address the Polish people

2016/07/11 • News

In a video appeal to the Polish people, Ukrainian students and activists tell that Ukraine and Poland have many sad pages in their history, and asks to talk about their common past without quarrels, but with mutual understanding.

“Enmity between our nations once led to loss of statehood and independence for Ukraine and Poland, to thousands of killed Ukrainians and Poles,” the participants state, and appeal to the Polish people to not  allow irresponsible politicians to repeat this scenario, which Russia, now threatening western countries with invasion, is waiting for.

The authors of the appeal stress that the time has come for the two nations to say “we forgive and ask for forgiveness.”

The appeal is also available in Polish:

After the change of government in Poland, Ukrainian-Polish relations started going through hard times, the stumbling stone being the interpretation of the Volyn tragedy of 1943-1944, a series of ethnic cleansings of Poles perpetrated by the Organization of Ukrainian nationalists revolting against Polish politics of repression against national minorities. A letter penned by representatives of the Ukrainian elite asking for a day of mutual remembrance for the victims was received with mixed attitudes in Polish society. On 11 July 2016, the Polish Sejm is to vote on the subject of classifying the Volyn Tragedy as genocide.

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  • Robert

    Forgive. Tolerate. Investigate. Communicate. …

    Realize through Real Eyes y’all have Common Heritage, Common Experience, Common Core Values … Common Goals … Common Future … Together…

    As Human Beings we are all Peers … We have far more in Common than we know… or admit…

    As Humans BEing, … we have far more to Grow Together … than we currently show…

    Proudly show the Absolute Best in all you do, think, say and Hope for … only then will it Manifest in Reality… Sacredly Share Life Together… as Honorable Humans Being on Planet Earth … just do it for your Children … and your GrandChildren … and their Children … and their GrandChildren…

    Life is Good. Life is Great. Let us Sacredly Create an atmosphere, environment … at the very least … a Safe Place for our Loved Ones … that follow on after us…

  • zorbatheturk

    Poland and Ukraine face a common enemy – Vladolf Putler.

    • laker48

      The sooner the Volhynia massacre is recognised by the Ukrainians as genocide, the better for both nations. Don’t let several thousand thugs belonging to the OUN/UPA-B splinter of the Ukrainian independence movement give the whole nation a black eye. There’s still a code of silence in western Ukraine and many burial sites of the massacre victims are kept secret by the locals.

  • laker48

    Fair is fair. Call a spade a spade. It was GENOCIDE. The sooner you realise this, the better. Poland doesn’t have any claims against Ukraine, but demands justice for brutally murdered, after sometimes long hours of inhuman and inhumane tortures innocent and unarmed Polish civilians by OUN/UPA-B (Bandera) thugs and local Ukrainian villagers, sometimes with open blessings of Ukrainian Greco-Catholic and Orthodox clergymen. That genocide was only dwarfed by German and Soviet acts of genocide committed on other nations. http://www.volhyniamassacre.eu/?a=4639

  • Rick

    I know it’s very painful and difficult for Ukrainians to accept that some of their national “heroes” — albeit inspired and abetted by the Nazi SS — organized the methodical extermination of non-Ukrainian civilians on a vast scale and saw that it was carried out with unheard-of ruthlessness and barbarian savagery.

    We all wish it hadn’t happened, but unfortunately it did — and no amount of semantic wriggling on the part of bogus historians and journalists can change the facts. The first step is for some Ukrainians to realize that they’ve been brainwashed by the UPA / OUN propaganda machine.

    Recently a Ukrainian delegation to the Czech Republic was shocked to discover that the Czech president called Bandera a mass murderer and refused to have anything to do with them until they got their facts straight!

    Eventually the Ukrainians will realize that it’s in their own Ukrainian interest to ditch bogus heroes like Bandera and Shukhevych, who are in the same category as German Nazi war criminals. What we’re talking about here is not tit-for-tat reprisal raids but terrorist genocide that was planned in cold blood — purely in order to rid the Ukraine of all “foreigners”.

    Fortunately, after the first murders Polish civilians were able to put up some armed resistance and were sometimes even given weapons by ordinary German soldiers who themselves found the savagery of the Ukrainians difficult to stomach.

    In German schools children are told the bitter truth about German Nazi war crimes and German war criminals. Can’t you see that having a “Bandera Avenue” in Kiev is like having a “Hitler Avenue” in modern-day Berlin?

    • Tony

      Thats all fine but lets not simply demonize here, it doesnt help to understand the situation or learn from it. Lets remember that Bandera also fought against the [email protected] and soviets and that the Polish government in exile was not on Ukraines side at that time, they had their own plans for that region as a part of Poland.

      • laker48

        Poland fought against Nazi Germany and, by June 1941, the Soviets. The Ukrainians fought of the German side, so they painted themselves into the corner. The Ukrainians switched sides and were anything but a unified nation and they’re still at odds. No matter how one slices or dices the problem, the key word is “GENOCIDE”.. Poles know this all too well that nobody can change the past, but in Volhynia and many other regions of western Ukraine onnly ethnic Poles were targeted by OUN/UPA-B, what made it a classic example of genocide. This key word may open the door for real reconciliation. No Polish government targeted Ukrainians for physical annihilation at no time and on no territory in history.

        • Tony

          Ok, thanks. Indeed I have heard it said that Ukrainians also died at Volyn but if it was to protect Poles then that does not change the fact that Polish people were targeted based purely on race. Thus yes calling it a genocide seems right.
          “No Polish government targeted Ukrainians for physical annihilation” Maybe not but having your house and belongings burned down for being Ukrainian or being forcefully relocated (to a place thats not really ready for you, forcing you into a life of poverty) is not much of a moral high ground, but thats a different topic and wrong doings cannot simply be traded or subtracted from each other.

          • laker48

            Fresh wounds and and fresh, burning desire for revenge of many Polish Volhynia genocide survivors notwithstanding, we cannot call any Polish-speaking government in Poland in the years 1945-1992 a Polish government. The 1943-1945 genocide of Poles in western Ukraine jus cranked up the spiral of mutual violence, mistrust and hatred, what was exactly the Kremlin’s ultimate goal.

            The katsaps also kept pitting Belarusians and Ukrainians against Poles in then eastern Poland, now Belarus and western Ukraine, in the years 1923 and 1939. Belarusians didn’t buy it, while OUN-B enlisted into it with tragis final outcomes for both nations.

            Historians of both nations face a monumental task of digging into the core of the problem and objectively establishing as many facts as possible. This must be done fast in order to disarm RuSSian propaganda and write honest history books based on objective presentation of possible to establish facts in both countries. Bandera, a helter-skelter Ukrainian hero, doesn’t serve Ukraine’s interests best.

  • Rick

    Thanks to the UPA propaganda machine the Ukrainian Galizien-SS cult is very much alive. I think this short film just about says it all.

    • laker48

      That was a very objective an honest summary of Bandera who will eventually find his ultimate resting place on the ash heap of Ukrainian history. He was a small time terrorist and an opportunist switching sides at will. He never was a statesman, at least in Ukraine that became even more divided after the actions of his followers than before.