“This is not why we went to Russia”: Sevastopol citizens outraged by low salaries in occupied Crimea

 

Crimea

Source: Censor.NET
Translated by: Mariya Shcherbinina

Workers of the local port fleet came to protest in front of the public office of the chairman of Yedinaya Rossiya Dmitry Medvedev on Lazarev square in Sevastopol, reports censor.NET citing New Region.

They have not yet reached the point of protesting and canceling passenger boat trips, however, such a prospect is not entirely impossible.

According to sailor Viktor Olifirov, who has worked for the port fleet for 40 years, the workers of the company are “in shock of how small their salaries have become.” “In Ukraine we got 8-10 thousand hryvnia per month. Now we have advance payments of 2 thousand rubles and another 2 thousand as our salaries,” the sailor laments. “This is not why we went to Russia!”

Besides, the sailors, petty officers and captains of passenger boats are worried that the management promised not to issue them special uniforms and food during shifts. The towboat workers, who are also part of the port fleet, lament the lack of regular renovation on ferries. And all the workers, both on speedboats and towboats, are dissatisfied with the big number of war pensioners at leading posts in the port. While getting a stably high pension, they don’t care about the material welfare of the company.

The initiative group of the port workers addressed the management of the company and the city numerous times, in vain. The cashiers that service the passengers of speedboats at the Grafskaya jetty say: “Yes, we have a small salary, 8 thousand rubles, but the majority in town don’t get more.”

Source: Censor.NET
Translated by: Mariya Shcherbinina

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