Copyright © 2021 Euromaidanpress.com

The work of Euromaidan Press is supported by the International Renaissance Foundation

When referencing our materials, please include an active hyperlink to the Euromaidan Press material and a maximum 500-character extract of the story. To reprint anything longer, written permission must be acquired from [email protected].

Privacy and Cookie Policies.

Russian military equipment losses three times higher than Ukraine’s, visually confirmed evidence suggests

Ukrainian drone operators destroyed another damaged Russian tank in the Zaporizhzhia direction to prevent its evacuation and repairs. Screenshot of footage shared by Mysiagin TG channel
Russian military equipment losses three times higher than Ukraine’s, visually confirmed evidence suggests

According to the visually confirmed losses tracker Oryx, as of June 2023, Ukraine has lost equipment at a rate three times lower than Russia in the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine; its tank losses are even lower: one-fourth of Russia’s. However, in some categories, Ukraine’s losses are roughly 2x.

While these indicators give only an approximate assessment of the real extent Russian and Ukrainian military equipment losses in the war in Ukraine, nevertheless, the proportion is relevant to describe the real-life situation, as both sides share footage of destroyed equipment extensively.

Oryx compiles lists of visually confirmed losses from both the Ukrainian and Russian sides; as of 13 June, the rates of losses reveal only three categories in which Ukraine’s losses exceed Russia’s (calculated as a ratio of Ukrainian vs Russian losses):

  • Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicles and Infantry Mobility Vehicles (IMV) – 1.68
  • Radars And Communications Equipment – 1.94
  • Ships – 2.17

Another category where Ukraine’s losses approach Russia’s is Surface-to-air-missile systems – 0.96.

Russia especially has tried to target Ukraine’s air defense in recent months as it attempted to break through Ukraine’s “missile shield.” Unrelenting Russian missile and drone attacks have forced officials to raise the alarm about the possible exhaustion of Ukraine’s air defense and Ukraine’s allies to expedite the provision of air defense systems and ammunition.

However, in terms of tanks, Ukraine’s losses are only a quarter of Russia’s. Russia’s loss rates are especially high for Command posts and communications stations (Ukraine’s losses are only 0.05 of Russia’s) and for Electronic warfare systems (also 0.05).

Here is the full comparison of Russian vs Ukrainian military equipment losses in Russia’s war against Ukraine as of 13 June 2023, inspired by Défense & Sécurité Internationale.

Visually confirmed losses of Ukraine and Russia as of 13 June 2023

Materiel

Russian losses

Ukrainian losses

Ukrainian / Russian losses

Tanks

2027

528

0.26

Armored Fighting Vehicles

879

284

0.32

Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Missile Systems

38

21

0.55

Infantry Fighting Vehicles

2393

563

0.24

Armored Personnel Carriers

312

273

0.88

MRAP and IMV

233

392

1.68

Engineering Vehicles

310

64

0.21

Command Posts and Communications Stations

243

13

0.05

Artillery Support Systems

103

23

0.22

Towed Artillery

646

292

0.45

MLRS

207

45

0.22

Anti-aircraft guns

41

10

0.24

Electronic warfare systems

40

2

0.05

Radars

32

62

1.94

Surface-To-Air Missile Systems

118

113

0.96

Planes

82

68

0.83

Helicopters

90

30

0.33

Drones

244

134

0.55

Trucks and unarmored vehicles

2564

645

0.25

Ships

12

26

2.17

Total

10614

3588

0.34

Russia’s higher attrition losses, combined with the weapons supply of Ukraine’s allies, have led to the countries’ balance of power equaling out over 14 months of the Russian invasion. The difference is especially seen in terms of tanks, which are essential for Ukraine to retake

Russian Ukrainian losses equipment in war
Image by Volodymyr Dacenko. More in the article Ukraine now probably has as many tanks as Russia
You could close this page. Or you could join our community and help us produce more materials like this.  We keep our reporting open and accessible to everyone because we believe in the power of free information. This is why our small, cost-effective team depends on the support of readers like you to bring deliver timely news, quality analysis, and on-the-ground reports about Russia's war against Ukraine and Ukraine's struggle to build a democratic society. A little bit goes a long way: for as little as the cost of one cup of coffee a month, you can help build bridges between Ukraine and the rest of the world, plus become a co-creator and vote for topics we should cover next. Become a patron or see other ways to support. Become a Patron!

To suggest a correction or clarification, write to us here

You can also highlight the text and press Ctrl + Enter

Please leave your suggestions or corrections here