Putin may not get a new Yalta but face a new Star Wars program, Pastukhov says

In his annual address to Russia's parliament on March 1, 2018, Vladimir Putin boasted about the Kremlin's increasing military might, hyping supposedly new nuclear weaponry that he said would render NATO defenses "completely useless." The charts on the wall screen behind Putin show Russian buildup of long-range high-precision offensive weapons, such as cruise missiles, as compared to 2012 (Image: video capture)

In his annual address to Russia's parliament on March 1, 2018, Vladimir Putin boasted about the Kremlin's increasing military might, hyping supposedly new nuclear weaponry that he said would render NATO defenses "completely useless." The charts on the wall screen behind Putin show Russian buildup of long-range high-precision offensive weapons, such as cruise missiles, as compared to 2012 (Image: video capture) 

Analysis & Opinion, Russia

Vladimir Putin’s address yesterday was primarily directed at his domestic audience which wouldn’t have believed him if he promised improvements at home but could be kept drugged with a surrogate for imperial triumphs by his suggestion that Russia has weapons that mean America is “already ours,” Vladimir Pastukhov says.

But unfortunately for him, the Kremlin leader isn’t able to keep his remarks away from those beyond Russia’s borders, the UK-based Russian historian says; and they will read Putin’s threatening tone not as a reflection of Russia’s real power, which is much less than the West’s, but as a reason to extend their advantage.

Because that is so, Pastukhov says, Putin won’t get what he wants and virtually promises his electorate, “a new Yalta” in which the West will divide things up with a revived Russia, but a new version of Ronald Reagan’s Star Wars, which Moscow wasn’t and again isn’t in a position to counter.

The Kremlin leader certainly achieved his goal with the Russian people providing them with a “surrogate” for the narcotic of real imperial conquests like the Crimean Anschluss.

To judge by his words, the historian says, “America is already ours” because Russia has weapons which no one else has and against which no one can defend.

Thus, Pastukhov continues, if one accepts Putin’s logic, Russia “has the right to dictate its will to even the most powerful state in the world; and if it doesn’t do so, then this is only the result of its innate peace-loving quality.” That is not the kind of language he is likely to use with Trump or other Western leaders, however. They have their own sources of information.

But by his words, Putin “without suspecting it, quite possibly has really provoked the beginning of profound transformations in Russia. Unfortunately for him,” however, Pastukhov argues, “the form of talk with electors chosen by him cannot remain a secret between the two of them.”

In his annual address to Russia's parliament on March 1, 2018, Vladimir Putin claimed that Russia developed a cruise missile with a nuclear-powered propulsion engine with an unlimited range. (Image: video capture)

In his annual address to Russia’s parliament on March 1, 2018, Vladimir Putin claimed that Russia developed a cruise missile with a nuclear-powered propulsion engine with an unlimited range. (Image: video capture)

People in the West are going to read it to, and he may think he has frightened them. “But this is not entirely correct.” Those who follow such things know what Russia can and cannot do whatever Putin says, and the Kremlin leader’s words have thus only “armed Western hawks and real rather than invented ‘Russophobes,’ who in general aren’t so few in number.”

It is thus quite likely, Pastukhov says, that “the militant rhetoric of the Kremlin intended mostly for internal use all the same will provoke a serious move toward a real arms race, consolidate anti-Russian circles in the West and force them to develop still more actively scenarios for ‘containing’ Russia.”

“Considering that the total financial, economic, technological and beyond doubt military might of the West exceeds the Russian potential many times over, Putin could get instead of ‘a new Yalta’ a new ‘Star Wars’” and the second edition of that could have results very much like the first.

Again, it will be difficult for Moscow to keep up, and it may soon be the case that Putin will wish that he could call back his words.

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Edited by: A. N.

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  • laker48

    Putin’s cocky boasting about a hypersonic, nuclear-powered cruise missile able to cruise almost indefinitely invoked many a smile around the globe.

    • Ihor Dawydiak

      So have his claims of making Russia a master of the high seas. With only one continuously malfunctioning aircraft carrier, how does Russia’s Grand Pederast plan to match America’s highly advanced fleet of 12 nuclear powered aircraft carriers?? This would take at least a decade or more, advanced technology and money which Putin and his howling hyenas simply do not have. LOL!

      • Dagwood Bumstead

        Where is the dwarf going to build the carriers? Can Dwarfstan’s industrial base actually support such construction? It can’t even complete frigates for the navy because the Ukrainians won’t supply the required gas turbines and reduction gearing- and they certainly won’t supply any stuff for the dwarf’s projected carrier farce.

    • Oknemfrod

      No doubt about it, many of them having been mine. But have you noticed the reaction to that bragging on the muzzles of the creatures comprising his audience? I’ve found it way more amusing than the ludicrous hogwash pouring out of the Putler’s trap. By God, those oafs did indeed appear to believe it!

      When he was lying about the Russian “achievements” in the civil sector, their snoring snouts looked like that of a possum doing his act. But once he started showing his staled cartoons with fake sci-fi contraptions supposedly capable of nuking Florida with impunity, all of a sudden their mugs lit up with elation and the hands started moving, alternating between violent clapping and joyous backpatting.

      • Ihor Dawydiak

        But who does Putin think he’s fooling? Certainly not his international audience. I clearly remember an English language televised interview between a journalist and the former President of Mexico (Vicente Fox) who related a story about a meeting he had with Putin in the Kremlin near the end of his Presidency. After having been kept waiting for over two hours, Fox mimicked the opening of the overly ornate doors opening for Putin’s grand entrance and the sound of trumpets blaring “too doo doo too doo doo” with several repetitions followed by the diminutive Russian mouse creeping in as if it was stalking a piece of cheese. Fox then mentioned that he had to use his utmost power from bursting out in laughter. After all, that would have been less than diplomatic. Respect, indeed.

        • Oknemfrod

          There’re two possibilities:

          (a) It wasn’t intended for the international audience but only for the domestic sheeple quite receptive to this kind of rubbish.

          (b) It was intended for the international audience, too. If so, he must have totally lost his marbles fancying that the speech would produce the effect he wants (while in reality, it can only give the US military complex all the more justification to ask the Congress for more moolah and get it, too). Perhaps the matter is even worse, and he is so densely stupid that he actually believes the war-mongering tales he read from the podium. Judging from his body language and genuine, hard to mimic, eagerness through the saber rattling part (as opposed to the obvious boredom preceding it), there’s a sizable chance he does and he is.

          • Dagwood Bumstead

            Pedo Putolini didn’t explain how Dwarfstan is going to afford all those new toys. Alexei Kudrin told the dwarf in 2011 that the country couldn’t afford all the new military hardware the dwarf wanted, and was sacked for his impertinence. At that time oil was at over $100 per barrel and it’s nowhere near that price now. Are pensions going to be cut? Even less rubbles for education, infrastructure, health care and other trivia the dwarf apparently considers irrelevant? Dwarfstan doesn’t have an economy to speak of now; keep up the ridiculous spending on the armed forces and the senseless aggression in the Donbas and Syria and pretty soon the country won’t even have that measly economy.

          • zorbatheturk

            This will be the crux of it. RuSSia is close to broke. I don’t believe its reported net public debt baloney of 15% at all.

          • Dagwood Bumstead

            That’s probably because the debts of (semi-) state banks and companies aren’t included, though they are massive. These companies and banks have a total debt to the west of some $600 billion. Add these debts to the official state debt and you get a very different picture.

      • Dagwood Bumstead

        The Süddeutsche Zeitung has an interesting take on the dwarf’s new wonderweapon:

        http://www.sueddeutsche.de/wissen/atomare-ruestung-putins-dubiose-wunderwaffe-1.3889703

        Given the parlous state of Dwarfstan’s industry it’s highly unlikely that Dwarfstan can actually build such an atomic-powered missile. Does the dwarf really believe he has impressed us? Oh well, perhaps he has impressed his favourite little boys.

        • Oknemfrod

          Thanks, Dag. Pity I don’t know German, but GT is a friend of mine ;).

          • Dagwood Bumstead

            Given the delays in Dwarfstan’s prestige projects such as the new space station in the Far East- which consists of known and proven technology- chances of Dwarfstan’s industry actually successfully building such an advanced weapons system would seem to be remote. By the way, did anybody else notice that Dwarfstan sent some new Su-57 Stealth fighters to Syria with much fanfare, but almost immediately withdrew them? Is the dwarf afraid of at least one of them being shot down by the Kurds, al-Nusrah or any other group hostile to Assad and Dwarfstan and the wreckage ending up in the US? Or is the Su-57 simply not ready for service?

          • Oknemfrod

            Vis-a-vis the Su-57, methinks he is afraid that it will crash simply because it’s heavier than air. In his speech, he was blabbing about some wonder missile with “an unpredictable trajectory”. Given the Russia’s recent aeronautical “successes”, he must know something about it – like that Russian rocket with 18 satellites that ended up on the ocean floor instead of the outer space.

            p.s. Now the dwarf is talking up some new wonder bridge from Sakhalin to Hokkaido at the tune of the projected cost of 600 billion rubles.

          • Dagwood Bumstead

            The bridge no doubt to be built by Arkady Rotenberg’s construction company, or one of the dwarf’s other cronies- meaning its total cost will be double the projected cost. This is assuming it will even be built in the first place as there’s no benefit to Japan. Trade between Sakhalin and Japan is hardly earth-shattering, so why would dai-Nippon agree? IF Tokyo agrees, it will demand a BIG quid pro quo, something the dwarf won’t accept.

          • Oknemfrod

            Exactly. You’ve hit every nail on the head.

  • zorbatheturk

    What the Putin? Have you totally lost your marbles, Vladolf? Threatening the mighty West with nukes? You need to swallow some antipsychotics pronto.