Ukrainian teen abducted by Russian FSB charged with school bomb plot, denied medical treatment

Pavlo Hryb and his lawyer Andrey Sabinin on trial in Krasnodar, 18 October 2017

Pavlo Hryb and his lawyer Andrey Sabinin on trial in Krasnodar, 18 October 2017 

News, Russia

19-y.o. Ukrainian hostage Pavlo Hryb, who was abducted by Russian security forces (FSB) in Belarus in August 2017, has been officially imputed a phantasmagorical crime: incitement to blowing up a Russian school.

While Pavlo now faces 5 to 10-year imprisonment, his life remains at risk as he has a disability related to the work of his blood circulatory system. After the intervention of the European Court of Human Rights, Russia reported that he is overall healthy, but Pavlo’s doctors said, speaking at a press conference, that his medical condition is “grave,” as evidenced by the ulcers on his face, red eyes, and weakness which his lawyer reported after seeing the young man in prison. For two months, the prisoner is not allowed to take necessary medication, and Ukrainian physicians are denied access to him. In the Russian city of Krasnodar, where Pavlo is held, there are no local specialists who can save him in case of internal bleeding. This may happen anytime, Ukrainian doctors stress.

Several other Ukrainian citizens imprisoned by the Kremlin regime on political grounds have been accused of plotting explosions, including the filmmaker Oleg Sentsov, anarchist Oleksandr Kolchenko, historian Oleksiy Chyrniy, and pensioner Oleksiy Syzonovych. None of the “terrorist” charges against them seem plausible. In the case of Hryb, however, Russian investigators transcended themselves as Hryb was seized neither in the Russian Federation nor in occupied Crimea; moreover, he had never been to Russia until he was transported there by force.

Russian FSB have presented their version this week at the court hearing, which ended with the prolongation of Pavlo’s illegal arrest until 4 January 2018. As they state, last spring the FSB allegedly noticed a mention of “school blasting” in Pavlo’s Skype correspondence with his female friend, a final year school student from Russia’s Krasnodar Krai. In view of the investigator, this amounts to the involvement of another person in terrorist activities (Part One of Article 205.1 of the Russian Criminal Code), which is punished with 5 to 10 years in jail. It remains unclear whether such a facetious mention took place indeed or was completely concocted by the “law enforcers” as no records or transcripts of those conversations were presented.

According to the chronology drawn up by the prisoner’s father, in mid-summer 2017, after the girl successfully graduated from her school (while no blasting had happened), the regional FSB branch instituted a criminal case against her. The security officers searched her apartment and forced her into self-incrimination based on the misinterpreted words. Then they made her participate in a special transborder operation aimed at luring Hryb to Belarus at the end of August.

“The specter of a terrorist threat was liquidated just as successfully as it was created two months before,” sarcastically writes his father. “The FSB eat their bread not in vain.”

Read also:

Tags: , ,

  • focusser

    Please show your proof of Nazis in the government of Ukraine. If not, shut the fukk up.

    • Screwdriver

      Tell this to Witold Waszczykowski, why he said this to you:
      “Z Banderą do Europy nie wejdziecie”

      • focusser

        That is the sum of your proof? Try again.

  • Tony

    nazi russian logic, kidnap innocents for some sort of trade, terrorist logic really.

    • Screwdriver

      You right about that buddy, this is how Ukrainian Nazis operate.
      “Under the watchful eyes of mediators from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the prisoners walked past one another to freedom.

      Then the questions started to pop up. The pro-Russian separatists — who with the aid of the Russian Army routed the Ukrainians in battles in August, taking many captives — released men appearing to be actual prisoners of war.

      The Ukrainians, however, widely understood to be lacking enough prisoners of their own to effect a one-for-one exchange, set free a motley group of men, women and teenagers wearing tracksuits or dirty jeans, and taken, they said, from jails as far away as Kiev.

      Soon enough, many of them were objecting to anybody who would listen there on the highway that they had never fought for pro-Russian separatists, and in fact had no idea how they ended up in a prisoner exchange in eastern Ukraine”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/25/world/europe/ukraine-prisoner-swaps-russian-separatists.html

      • zorbatheturk

        Bogov, you RuSSian turdsucker.

      • Brent

        What makes you think you are anyone’s “buddy”?

        You’re a useless lazy Russo Nazzi toilet cleaner who is too gutless to fight for the Russo Nazzi cause of murder and invasion and tries to raise money for his terrorist buddies all while hiding like a coward in South Philly…

  • Tony

    Dont travel to russia or places still in the “russian world”, its a shithole and dangerous.

  • svend

    Sorry for you. You can only follow the Nazi-Troll manual. We all now about it, so it not actual anymore, it just shows that you little Russian Teens are out of real argument and crawl bach to mummy(manual)

    • Screwdriver

      You forgot to tell me bro…about those never arrested protesters in Kiev :-)
      Short memory gizzer ? I get it.

  • zorbatheturk

    No such thing as a fair trial in RuSSia.

  • Brent

    I have a better idea. Exchange him for YOU. You go back to the sh*thole Russia that you love so much. You’ll miss your toilet cleaning empire in South Philly very quickly once you have to resort to a diet of ratburgers and palm oil cheese.