Weapons from Donbas rush back to Russia sparking a rise in violent crime

Russian mercenaries in the Donbas posing with their weapons. This photograph is from an InformNapalm.org investigation of social profiles of Russian mercenaries and servicemen that discovered more proof of Russia’s aggression against Ukraine. In this case, it is Russian R-381T2 'Taran' UHF radio monitoring and ‘Torn’ radio intelligence complexes (boxed in red in the background). Image: InformNapalm.org

Russian mercenaries in the Donbas posing with their weapons. This photograph is from an InformNapalm.org investigation of social profiles of Russian mercenaries and servicemen that discovered more proof of Russia’s aggression against Ukraine. In this case, it is Russian R-381T2 'Taran' UHF radio monitoring and ‘Torn’ radio intelligence complexes (boxed in red in the background). Image: InformNapalm.org 

2016/08/03 • Analysis & Opinion, Russia

The black market in Russia for weapons has grown by almost 50 percent since 2012, largely as a result of the influx of guns brought back to Russia by mercenaries who went there to fight but are now returning home, experts say. And that trend in turn has sparked a continuing rise in violent crime in many parts of Russia.

But what may be prove most worrisome is that the weapons coming back from the Donbas are advanced, modern ones; and these are displacing the older and less lethal guns that had been the mainstays of the Russian arms black market, according to an investigation by Pavel Merzlikin’s of St. Petersburg’s Bumaga published by Meduza.io.

Weapons captured by the Russian special forces and mercenaries after the fall of a Ukrainian military base. Donetsk, Ukraine, 27 June, 2014. (Image: Dmitry Lovetsky, AP/Scanpix/LETA)

Weapons captured by the Russian special forces and mercenaries after the fall of a Ukrainian military base. Donetsk, Ukraine, 27 June, 2014. (Image: Dmitry Lovetsky, AP/Scanpix/LETA)

Russian border guards have tried to stem this flow [of the two thousand kilometers of (1.3 thousand miles) of its border with Russia, Ukraine has no control of 409 km (254 miles) — Ed.], and many mercenaries returning from the occupied Ukrainian territory have been stopped, the weapons they have confiscated, and court cases lodged against them [for arms trafficking only, not for mercenary activity, which is also illegal in Russia — Ed.]. But despite those efforts, the flow of guns and other weapons from the Donbas into Russia has continued to increase.

One Russian interior ministry source told Merzlikin

Many “volunteers from Russia regularly return to their motherland literally ‘loaded down with weapons,’” often Kalashnikovs and Makarov pistols but also landmines and other ordnance as well.

Other sources said officials had stepped up efforts to block the flow, making it increasingly difficult to import contraband.

The 409 kilometers (254 miles) of the border between the occupied Ukrainian territories and Russia are not controlled by Ukraine and are used by Russian mercenaries and regular servicemen to smuggle weapons from the Russo-Ukrainian war back into Russia. (Image: Hanna Naronina, Euromaidan Press)

The 409 kilometers (254 miles) of the border between the occupied Ukrainian territories and Russia are not controlled by Ukraine and are used by Russian mercenaries and regular servicemen to smuggle weapons from the Russo-Ukrainian war back into Russia. (Image: Hanna Naronina, Euromaidan Press)

The Russian interior ministry reported that there were as many as 14 million guns changing hands illegally in Russia in 2012. No new data have been published, but Igor Shmelyev, of the Right to Arms movement, says that now that figure may be as high as 20 million.

Given that only 4.4 million Russians have the right to bear arms and they have 6.7 million guns registered as in their possession, that means the guns coming in from the Russo-Ukrainian war in Ukraine’s Donbas are going into the black market and being held illegally. One result, is that the number of crimes involving the use of guns went up 25 percent in 2015, Russian officials say.

Uspenka border crossing is one of many on the 409-km part of the Ukrainian-Russian border that is not controlled by Ukraine, which is used by Russian mercenaries and regular servicemen to smuggle weapons from the Russo-Ukrainian war back into Russia. (Image: Hanna Naronina, Euromaidan Press)February 2015 (Image: Vasiliy Maximov, AFP/Scanpix/LETA)

Uspenka border crossing is one of many on the 409-km part of the Ukrainian-Russian border that is not controlled by Ukraine, which is used by Russian mercenaries and regular servicemen to smuggle weapons from the Russo-Ukrainian war back into Russia. (Image: Hanna Naronina, Euromaidan Press)February 2015 (Image: Vasiliy Maximov, AFP/Scanpix/LETA)

This year, the number of such crimes has gone up to almost 16,000, 3.4 percent more than for the same period last year [The numbers are likely inaccurate as much of Russian official statistics are subject to political considerations by agencies that track the data, the Interior Ministry in this case — Ed.] Vladimir Putin personally called for a crackdown on the buying and selling of weapons last April, but it is unclear how much of an impact that appeal has had.

Advertisements for guns appear regularly on the Internet, and demand appears to be brisk. According to Merzlikin, “sellers don’t care what purchasers plan to do with their purchases.” Some may be collectors, others “nervous” Muscovites, and still others “potential criminal[s].”


Related:

 

Edited by: A. N.

Tags: , , , , ,

  • Brent

    Good. Let the Russians start killing each other instead of people from other countries.

    I wonder how long until the demented dwarf blames Ukraine for not controlling the flow of weapons through the portion of the border….controlled by Russia!

    • Dagwood Bumstead

      Fully concur. And with a bit of luck Pedo Putolini and his corrupt henchmen Medvedev, Rogozin, Lozhvrov, Shoigu, Siluanov will become targets of their own weapons, not to mention Zhirinovskii, Girkin, Borodai, Bezler, Aleksandr Dugin, Tamara Guzenkova and Patriarch Kirill.

      • Randolph Carter

        I had no idea there were so many thugs – Putin could have his own football team (American or European). There’s something poetic here; no honor among thieves, karma’s a bitch, or the Russian proverb: “As you cooked the porridge, so must you eat it”

  • Eddy Verhaeghe

    The chickens come home to roost…

  • Evelyn Myketa Livingston

    I’m glad to see this happening in russia but sadly, it is also possible in Ukraine.

    • Dagwood Bumstead

      If I were a Ukrainian, I’d want at least an AK with several spare magazines and lots of bullets in the house, just in case Pedo Putolini decides to invade other parts of the country including my oblast.

  • Alex George

    Just another side-effect of the war which the Kremlin never thought about.

    Using proxies to invade Eastern Ukraine must have seemed so easy. Until the invasion failed (mostly; they managed to get Crimea and a very small slice of the east). Now it is a frozen conflict, with many Russians rotated through the war zone, and ample opportunity to bring weapons home.

    • Dagwood Bumstead

      And they only got the Crimea through surprise, disarray in Kyiv, pressure from Washington, Berlin and Paris to do nothing, and a Ukrainian army that was easily the worst in Europe at that time. Also because the dwarf committed war crimes by sending in troops without any indication of their nationality, transported in helicopters and aircraft without any markings.

  • Dirk Smith

    One of the silver linings to fascist ruSSia’s invasion of Ukraine. Another step towards Maidan Moscow……..

  • Vlad Pufagtinenko

    A good news story finally