Putin returning Russia ‘not to Soviet but to Stalinist’ state security system, Felgenhauer says

Putin seeks to recreate the Stalinist system of state security in Russia (Image: FSB press service)

Putin seeks to recreate the Stalinist system of state security in Russia (Image: FSB press service) 

2016/09/22 • Analysis & Opinion, Military analysis, Russia

Reports that Vladimir Putin wants to create a single security agency in place of the plethora of such institutions Russia has now shows that he is seeking to return “not just to a Soviet but to a Stalinist” state security system, something that threatens both the Russian people and Russia’s neighbors, Pavel Felgenhauer says.

Pavel Felgenhauer

Pavel Felgenhauer, Russian military analyst

The independent Russian military analyst argues that “Russia is a country of special services and that under existing conditions, the powers that be have no other choice” but to allow everything to fall part or “return to Stalinist methods” and use force to try to hold on.

Discussions in Moscow about recreating a single ministry of state security are taking place now, Felgenhauer says,

“because the situation in Russia is becoming still worse, its future prospects are quite bad, there is a foreign war and a domestic war, conflicts within the leadership, [and] a struggle between the defense ministry and the finance ministry.”

Moreover, he says, “there is a catastrophic shortage of money, the life of the population is getting worse, and it is necessary to be prepared for anything.” That makes the creation of such a super state security ministry both understandable and timely as far as Putin is concerned.

In the short-term, this institution will not threaten Ukraine directly, but over the longer haul, it will have an impact as the war drags on. Indeed, Felgenhauer says, it can pose a serious threat to Ukraine because of what it shows about the nature of the opponent Kyiv faces now and in the future.

There is a more immediate Ukrainian link, and it is one that Russia, Ukraine and the entire international community should recognize and draw conclusions from: Putin tested out the process of “creating such agencies” in the “LNR” and “DNR” and is now translating them into Russia, yet another indication of kind of cancers they represent to Russia and the world.


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Edited by: A. N.

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  • zorbatheturk

    Putin shows his true colors. A Stalinist to the core. Putinism = Stalinism with a dollop of old-fashioned nationalistic fascism. How 21st century {sarc}.

  • Terry Washington

    I can say with all certainty that this attempt of the “fish eyed Chekist”(as I call Putin) to”keep the past on its throne”(as the Continentals said of King George III during the US War Of Independence) will NOT work- you cannot be a Stalinist in a post Stalin era. Has Putin never heard of Marx’s quip that history repeats itself first as tragedy and then as farce!

    • Dagwood Bumstead

      I’d say the dwarf Pedo Putolini is doing a pretty “good” job of recreating Stalinism so there IS a (neo-)Stalinist world in Dwarfstan. I don’t feel sorry for the Dwarfstanians. They want a Stalin-like leader, now they’ve got what they wanted complete with show trials (Khodorkovsky, Pussy Riot, Navalny etc) and no doubt soon secret executions and labour camps. Kolyma and Vorkuta, anyone?

      • Quartermaster

        A funny thing, which I doubt will be dealt with by Putin, is that Stalin was shown to be a Tsarist provocateur. Khrushchev didn’t want to hear it because he just could not wrap his head around the fact that they’d been ruled by a provocateur for 30 years.

  • Dagwood Bumstead

    It’s merely a question of time, but Pedo Putolini will resurrect Article 58, the Gulag and execution sites such as Butovo, Krasny Bor and Rzhevsky. Of course, now that he has mobile crematoria, there won’t be any remains of those executed to be found but at best ash heaps- if he doesn’t have the ashes dumped at sea or in the nearest river that is.

  • Terry Washington

    All this will work for a time admittedly, but not indefinitely(as Stalin did)!

    • Alex George

      True.

      Stalin inherited (from Lenin) virtually all of Nicholas II’s empire – the core of Russia + eastern Ukraine + Belarus, plus the Central Asian states. That gave him a strong base to work from. He added parts of eastern Europe via his treaty with Hitler, and then after Hitler turned on him and was defeated (with the substantial help of the western powers) he added much of eastern and central Europe, and parts of Japan as well.

      But Putin is starting out with just Russia. And for the past 2 years he has been stuck at Ukraine, unable to advance any further. That’s a big difference.