Trojan convoys: Putin’s hidden invasion

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2015/08/09 • Analysis & Opinion

Article by: Kirill Mikhailov

As 145 white trucks rolled into Ukraine through Russian-controlled Izvarine on 22 August 2014, all the eyes of the Western and local media was on Putin’s new “humanitarian aid convoy” motion. Journalists followed the huge column from Narofominsk near Moscow to the Ukrainian border, where it didn’t wait for full clearance by Ukrainian authorities and barged into the territories of the self-proclaimed “LNR” and “DNR”. Since then, a total of 34 convoys have entered Ukraine, all without clearance by Ukrainian border control. They are coming almost on a weekly basis, without yet left largely unnoticed by the larger world. This is troubling, to say the least, as this hybrid war tactic certainly deserves more attention. Here is what we know so far about the Russian convoys to Donbas.

1. None of the convoys have been properly inspected by Ukrainian border control

The initial convoys have sparked Ukrainian and international condemnation, officials asserting that cargo entering en masse without Ukrainian border control amounts to invasion. However, as the interest to the convoy campaign gradually subsided, this overt violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty is left unanswered, accepted as a new reality. Today, all of the Russian convoys enter Ukraine through the parts of the border which Ukraine has no control over; Ukrainian border guards at best can observe, but not inspect the cargo.

Trucks of a Russian convoy carrying humanitarian aid for Ukraine drive onto the territory of a Russia-Ukraine border crossing point "Donetsk", as a woman waits for her son who has fled from fighting in eastern regions of Ukraine and is expected to cross the border, in Russia's Rostov Region, August 22, 2014. Ukraine declared on Friday that Russia had launched a "direct invasion" of its territory after Moscow sent a convoy of aid trucks across the border into eastern Ukraine where pro-Russian rebels are fighting government forces. REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk (RUSSIA - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS CONFLICT SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)

Russian “aid convoy enters” Ukraine through a Russian-controlled crossing. Photo: Reuters

2. The food supplies often end up being sold, not distributed as aid

One might argue that relieving Donbas from the ravages of war is more important than any international formalities. This could be agreed, if the convoy’s bona fide humanitarian cargo really did find those in need. However, as Russian independent Novaya Gazeta wrote in November, most of the humanitarian aid never reaches ordinary citizens, instead ending up in local stores. News from the Luhansk “republic” suggest that humanitarian supplies are used as a means to control unruly local terrorist commanders. Disloyal Cossacks may see humanitarian cargo cut off altogether, which is just another means Luhansk “authorities” use to consolidate their power (others being outright murder of those unwilling to submit).

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Humanitarian supplies sold in a local store. Pavel Kanygin/ Novaya Gazeta

3. The convoys serve their role as positive PR for the internal Russian audience, but some are mostly empty

Despite that, the convoys do serve their PR role, with each of them covered by Russia’s state media. For Kremlin’s propaganda machine, this is also another way to undermine Ukraine by accusing Ukrainian troops of planning provocations against the convoys that never came to fruition.

Suspicions have arisen that the convoy spectacle indeed was just for show as the white trucks were found to be mostly empty. Russian emergency ministry authorities explained this away by technical requirements. However, trucks carrying humanitarian aid from other donors (such as the Ukrainian oligarch Rinat Akhmetov) were full almost to the brim, raising questions as to the veracity of those technical requirements. To date, the half-emptiness of the Russian trucks still remains a mystery.

Later, Ukrainian security council spokesman accused the convoy of moving valuable equipment from Donbas factories to Russia.

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The inside of an almost empty Russian convoy truck. Photo: BBC

Trucks carrying humanitarian aid from Rinat Akhmetov. Photo: espreso.tv

Trucks carrying humanitarian aid from Ukrainian oligarch Rinat Akhmetov. Photo: espreso.tv

A truck with Polish humanitarian aid to Donbas. Photo: nbnews.com.ua/ua/news/152914

A truck with Polish humanitarian aid arrives in Donbas. Photo: nbnews.com.ua/ua/news/152914

4. The convoys could be used to distract from brewing military action

The very first convoy may have served yet another purpose, namely that of distraction. The trucks rolled in mid-August, as the battle of Ilovaisk was raging between Ukrainian forces and terrorists, for the first time massively aided by Russian regular troops. With the attention focused on the convoy, the conventional invasion probably had a better chance of staying covert. However, this tactic did backfire: while waiting for the convoy to cross the border, Western journalists spotted a column of unmarked military vehicles entering Ukraine.

5. Some of the convoys were crewed by Russian military

Since then, the crew and cargo of the convoys has been called into question. Ukrainian open source investigators at Informnapalm found that the trucks were manned by Russian military drivers and apparently accompanied by elite paratroopers. Curiously enough, the “white trucks” appeared to be hastily painted over from army khaki, spots of the previous color still visible under the tarp.

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Note the khaki color under the covering

6. The cargo was found to contain fuel, combat helmets, and propaganda materials

The proven content of the convoys has been found to be questionable, at best dual-purpose. Ukrainian border guards and OSCE observers, still allowed to visually inspect (but not scan or thoroughly check) the trucks, have reported them to contain fuel and even combat-grade helmets. In another alarming case, the trucks were carrying “advertising of unknown origin”. Another convoy carried history books with a Kremlin version of Donbas’s history, its Ukrainian past and Stalin’s atrocities not getting a mention, and yet another – flags of the unrecognized separatist republics and information materials for a “Novorossiya’s Day of Knowledge.” The last three cases signal yet another purpose of the convoys – tearing the occupied territories even further away from Ukraine through propaganda and indoctrination.

7. There is no conclusive evidence of the convoys transporting weapons yet, but why does Russia evade inspections of cargo?

Ukrainian border guards have stated that they have not seen weapons in the cargo; however, they’ve never had proper access to it. Moreover, some of the trucks were captured on satellite imagery at a militant base. While we can’t say with 100% certainty that the convoys do carry weapons in the conventional sense, the endless columns of white trucks sporting Russian colors and coats-of-arms are themselves a powerful weapon of the hybrid war. Silently undermining Ukraine’s sovereignty, used to exert control over armed thugs and their local hostages and sweetening Russia’s image in the fight over the locals’ minds, the convoys should receive a stronger international response, including sanctions on the companies that contribute to their contents.

Edited by: Alya Shandra

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  • Being

    Tragedy is and Who cares??? USA+UK with their Guarantee of territorial integrity and sovereignity for Ukraine from1994 (no they do not mean it), I somehow miss What do they do to stop the war ongoing almost 2years now. UN? Even no tribunal for 298 people shot from sky above Ukraine (80children was on board) and nobody cares. Some blabla bla is NOT enough! Saying that it is not a war or killing, raping, torturing is really THIS.
    Look what does UN do with 6years lasting war in Syria and Iraq. Now even EU invite imigrants in their millions to enrich us. To cut some heads here and some there, rape.
    World politicians do not care, They did it!!!
    They wanted to do it and they did.

  • Nowhere Girl

    The convoys are often empty because it’s not so important what they carry in, more important is what they carry out. Some suggest that Russia used these convoys to loot Donbas industry. It could also be used, perhaps, to transport some Gruz 200 and hide the real extent of the casualties… (Especially that now mobile crematories will be busy burning food.)
    By the way – I have seen a few funny cartoons about the convoys, usually related in some way to the Trojan horse story. For example a whole line of Trojan horses riding to Donetsk, or trucks with weapons sticking from under the tarpaulin and the driver shouting to a Ukrainian custom officer: “I’m from ‘Russians without borders’!”.