ATO Map: how the situation in Eastern Ukraine changed over two months

 

Infographics, War in the Donbas

Slovo i Dilo (Word and Deed) decided to demonstrate how the area once controlled by terrorists has changed in two months after the launch of the anti-terrorist operation in eastern Ukraine. After pro-Russian fighters and mercenaries announced the creation of the Luhansk and Donetsk People’s Republics, the Kyiv government declared the start of regional anti-terrorist operations. 

  • In May, the Ukrainian Army launched an attack on the terrorists who had tried to take control of the International Airport of Donetsk.
  • On June 13, Ukrainian forces drove the terrorists from Mariupol; within the next two days, the Ukrainian Army captured the city of Shchastia in the Luhansk Oblast.
  • On June 23, talks on peace negotiations were held in Donetsk; the parties agreed to a ceasefire on June 27. The truce was extended to 22:00 Monday, June 30.
  • On the night of July 1, the President of Ukraine, Petro Poroshenko, following a meeting of the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine, decided to suspend the unilateral ceasefire in the Donbas.
  • Two days after hostilities were resumed, ATO forces took control of the following towns: Zakotne (Luhansk Oblast) and Raihorodok, Riznykivka, and Rai-Oleksandrivka (Donetsk Oblast).
  • On July 5, the terrorists left Sloviansk. The same day, the city came under the control of Ukrainian Army and the Ukrainian flag was raised on the building of the Sloviansk City Council. Later that day, it was reported that the terrorists had also left Kramatorsk, Druzhkivka, and Kostiantynivka.
  • On July 10, having taken the city of Siversk and several other towns near Luhansk under control, National Guard units proceeded to investigate the localities.

Translated by Christine Chraibi
Source: slovoidilo.ua

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