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Associated Press: One year after liberation, Kherson holds on to hope for victory

Kherson protest Russian occupation
One of the first protests in Kherson against Russian occupation, 5 March 2022. Photo: Khersondaily
Associated Press: One year after liberation, Kherson holds on to hope for victory

On 11 November, 2022, the Ukrainian Army liberated Kherson from occupying Russian forces. However, one year after the liberation residents of the city still live amid constant Russian shelling and drone and missile attacks, as per the Associated Press

Ukrainians who stay in Kherson are steadfast in their belief that one day normal life will return. Many shops in Kherson remain shuttered and municipal workers have to wear bullet-proof vests and sweep up the rubble from another Russian shelling. 

Ukraine’s liberation of the city in prolonged assault a year ago was one of the country’s biggest successes in the war. After the occupation forces left Kherson, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy walked the streets, claiming Russia’s withdrawal as the “beginning of the end of the war.”

Despite hopes that the liberation of Kherson would serve as a springboard for more advances into occupied territory, today, Ukraine and Russia are locked in a stalemated battle of attrition as Kyiv needs more weapons to clear its territory from the Russian military. 

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