Moscow Patriarchate’s moves strengthen Russia’s hand in Ukraine, Kryuchkov says

Vladimir Putin and Patriarch Kirill meeting with members of the Holy Synod of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate. The head of UOC MP, Metropolitan Onufriy is seated in the middle of the row. July 27, 2013 in Kyiv, Ukraine (Image: kremlin.ru)

Vladimir Putin and Patriarch Kirill meeting with members of the Holy Synod of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate. The head of UOC MP, Metropolitan Onufriy is seated in the middle of the row. July 27, 2013 in Kyiv, Ukraine (Image: kremlin.ru) 

Analysis & Opinion, Ukraine

The decision of the Moscow Patriarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC MP) to allow the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (UOC MP) some greater flexibility and to begin talks with the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate (UOC KP) have two serious consequences, Igor Kryuchkov says.

On the one hand, the two deepen the split of world Orthodoxy, already riven by feuds among its various branches, the religious affairs commentator says; but on the other “they open the possibility for strengthening the influence of the Moscow Patriarchate in Ukraine,” a goal the Kremlin very much seeks.

The first decision, to allow the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate to administer its affairs from Kyiv did not change anything, ROC MP sources say. Instead, this decision was taken so that the church in Ukraine would not fall afoul of Kyiv’s hostility to any organization “’with an administrative center in the aggressor country.’”

And thus while it attracted a fair amount of attention and overreading – for a discussion of that, see Moscow Patriarchate hasn’t ‘freed’ Ukrainian Orthodox Church but rather imposed new limits – it is the second action by the ROC MP hierarchs that is far more important not only in Ukraine where it puts Orthodox there in a difficult position but in the Orthodox world more generally.

The relationship between the ROC MP and the UOC KP is fraught because the latter demands recognition of itself as an autocephalous church, and the ROC MP, committed to the principle of its self-proclaimed “canonical territory” across the entire former Soviet space is not prepared to take that step.

But the announcement by the hierarchs of the ROC MP that the Moscow church is now prepared to enter into talks with the UOC KP represents a breakthrough because the UOC KP is interested in only one thing: recognition of its self-standing status in the world of Orthodox Christianity.

Metropolitan Onufriy (standing), the head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate, talking to Moscow Patriarch Kirill. May 30, 2014 in St. Petersburg, Russia (Image: pravmir.ru)

Metropolitan Onufriy (standing), the head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate, talking to Moscow Patriarch Kirill. May 30, 2014 in St. Petersburg, Russia (Image: pravmir.ru)

Russian news agencies say, Kryuchkov continues, that the ROC MP intends to establish a special commission headed by Metropolitan Ilarion, the head of the Moscow patriarchate’s department of external relations. It raises the stakes in Ukraine, given that the UOC KP has indicated that it will never rejoin the ROC MP as Moscow has demanded.

As a source close to the UOC KP points out, there is no “generally recognized procedure for recognizing a new autocephaly” within Orthodoxy. On the one hand, some think that it can be offered only by the Mother Church, in this case, the ROC MP, which at least up to now has been unwilling to do that.

And on the other, some believe that it can be extended by the Constantinople patriarchate. Those who believe that placed great hopes in the Crete meeting last summer that was supposed to attract all Orthodox patriarchates but which in fact didn’t: The Bulgarian, Georgian and Antioch ones refused from the outset, and the ROC MP subsequently joined them.

The ROC MP blamed Constantinople for the failure of this meeting, “the first in 300 years,” Kryuchkov says. The real problem is that Constantinople views itself as the monarch among Orthodox while other Orthodox churches, including the Russian one view themselves as equal in standing.

The decisions this past week in Moscow, however, raise some important issues. By giving the UOC MP administrative independence at least nominally, the ROC MP has “strengthened the trend toward the differential of the positions of Constantinople and Moscow.” That risks leading to new conflicts among the Orthodox churches and thus Orthodox powers.

But the ROC MP has also “raised the political stakes in Ukraine. Having strengthened the autonomy of its Ukrainian branch, the ROC MP has put before the Kyiv authorities a hard choice: either to continue the struggle with influence in two Orthodox bishoprics, both of which are now [formally] subordinate to Kyiv or change its approach, which will lead only to a deepening of a religious split.”

And at the same time, because the ROC MP would like to emphasize its equality with Constantinople, Moscow may be quite pleased to at least discuss some kind of approach to autocephaly for the Orthodox in Ukraine, thus showing that it can do that “without an agreement with Constantinople.”

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Edited by: A. N.

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  • Ihor Dawydiak

    What is there to negotiate between the the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Kyiv Patriarchate) and the Russian Orthodox Church or its puppet Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate)? The ROC regards itself as the “Third Rome” and the “Mother Church” of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine whereas the UOC (KP) considers itself as an independent Ukrainian Orthodox Church based in Kyiv. Besides, the ROC “excommunicated” the UOC(KP) when they declared their independence from the Russian based Moscow Patriarchate. In addition, the UOC(KP) has recognized the Constantinople Patriarchate and its head, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, as the “first among equals” in the the Orthodox Communion. So what is there to talk about other than perhaps the time period needed for the transfer of churches such as the Pecherska Lavra to UOC(KP) control or for that matter the total absorption of the UOC(MP) by the UOC(KP)? It most certainly will not be about the independence of UOC(KP). Russia permanently lost both that Church and Ukraine when Ukrainian independence was declared and was internationally recognized in 1992.

    • Микола Данчук

      I’ll stick with the Uniate confession and avoid Moskva all together.

      • Ihor Dawydiak

        Aside from the fact that there are in excess of 5 million Ukrainians who share your point of view, it should also be noted that the ROC despises the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Kyiv Patriarchate) and the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church equally. Why? Some of the most significant reasons include; 1) Both the UOC(KP) and the UGCC are profound supporters of Ukrainian independence and are intensely intertwined with Ukrainian cultural and linguistic traditions. 2) Both the ROC and the Kremlin have accused both of the patriotic Ukrainian Churches of “poaching” Kirill’s “flock” whereas in truth an increasing number of parishes from the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate) have voluntarily defected to Ukraine’s patriotic churches. 3) Much to Moscow’s horror, the UOC(KP) and the UGCC have actively engaged in ecumenism going as far as to hold a number of joint religious services in several different parishes which were blessed by both Patriarchs Filaret Denysenko and Sviatoslav Shevchuk. As such, could there be any wonder as to why the Putin-Kirill axis has turned a very worrisome situation into absolute paranoia? After all, how can they stuff an escaped genie back into the bottle?

        • Микола Данчук

          Everything you said is fact, I was referencing to pre-Moskva.
          Uniate Catholicism is the Mother Church of Kyiv or Kiev from its beginning. Politics not religion has messed it all up into what we have today.

          • Ihor Dawydiak

            Technically speaking, the Mother Church of Kyivan Rus was Catholic until 1054 at which time the Eastern Orthodox tradition was established. This was subsequently termed as the Great East-West Schism. As for Uniate Catholicism, this was not established until 1596 following the Union of Brest which united mostly adherents of the Eastern Orthodox Church in Western Ukraine with Rome although this new church continued to follow many Orthodox traditions while recognizing the authority of the Supreme Pontiff in Rome. And yes, politics has indeed played a major role in the divisions that we see today.