Is Russia finally going to have to pay for its crimes?

ecthr

 

2015/03/14 • News, Political News, Russia, Ukraine

Today the European Court on Human Rights (ECHR) has started the inter-state case on the violations of human rights carried out by Russian forces on the territory of Ukraine since spring 2014. The case of Ukraine vs. Russia is going to be a conjoined hearing, consisting of five large cases considering multiple occasions of unlawful incarceration, torture and depriving of the right on life of Ukrainian citizens by Russian forces.

According to the director of the Foundation for Strategic Cases of the Ukrainian Helsinki Human Rights Union, Mikhail Tarahkalo, this case would mean a lot to Ukraine. In case of victory at the ECHR this would be the first step of the official international recognition of the fact of Russia’s responsibility for the actions of militants of DNR and LNR in Ukraine. This would be the first major decision of an independent international body recognizing the invasion of Russia on the territory of Donbas and distribution of its jurisdiction to the territory.

Will Russia take this easily? Considering how most of the major hostilities in the East Ukraine and some of rogue terrorist attacks in major Ukrainian cities have been occasionally timed to some of the biggest hearings on Ukrainian situation in Europe, there is a reason to up the vigilance for the Ukrainian special forces, as the language of diplomacy and law has been proven to be not the Russia’s way, as it demonstrated in the past year of atrocities and violence. Yet the international victory would be a turning point of war, and hence Ukraine has to gather all its resources to make this breakthrough happen.

“In case of recognition of the violations, Russia will be forced to pay substantial compensation to the applicants, i.e. Ukraine”, the Ukrainian Helsinki Group suggests, so clearly, many will be at stake in this hearing.

Source: ECHR
Source: Liga.net

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  • Rods

    I sincerely hope they succeed, so there is a small measure of justice for the people who have been bereaved and all those that have greatly suffered in the Donbas region as a result of this illegal Russian invasion.

  • http://frank.com Frank

    Cluster Bombs, Targeting of Civilians, Illegal Militias, just to name a few.
    Looks like the side with more blood on their hands is Kiev.

    Its sad when Senator McCain has to admit Kiev’s war crimes (although is excuse was we are not giving them enough weapons).

    • MasterOfpuppets

      50 cents army. Got yours?

    • dimitri visser

      The agressor in this case is Russia. Guilty of warcrimes, terrorism, shooting down of civilian airplane. illegally occupying Crimea, bombings in several Ukranian cities. The list with crimes is too long to mention here…

    • Milan Schulz

      take a hike troll, nobody likes you mate. Why don’t you focus on who started this god-damned war in the first place

    • Eugene Berkovich

      CLuster bombs, according to OSCE, were used by the Russians. Also, the Russians are targeting the civilians, not Ukrainians. And, finally, most volunteer batallions fighting on Ukrainian side are supporting the government and are operating within the framework of Ukrainian army. Now, the forces used by Russia, on the other hand, do not belong to any recognized government.

      • evanlarkspur

        Exactly. Indeed they have been denied connection to the only government that has a prayer of offering them even a sliver of legitimacy as a State actor.

        • Eugene Berkovich

          They’ve been denied nothing. Russian troops belong to Russia. The people living in the two eastern Ukrainian regions predominantly want to stay in Ukraine.

          • evanlarkspur

            I was agreeing with you. Relax.

    • Michel Cloarec

      hello little man ! How can a person living in the 21th century can support a country responsible for the holocaust, the holodomor, the gulags. Country who managed to send to death 26 millions of own soldiers. Country which is under the violences and the greed of a few cleptocrates which has to go on with wars, annexation, occupations, invasions, only to hide their crimes , and worst of all make millions of people in russia to believe they are doing right in the name of the grandeur of russia. Russia is only and has always been a stew of 190 ethcnic races, 83 republics. It is impossible to put one flagg over this stew without terror, strong FSB and well organized mafia and propaganda. How can people outside the big cities have a chance to receive modern welfare in this utopia ?
      Where are the so-called russians which emigrated to russia in the last months. Did someone asked them in their new locations ? They have been fooled the same ways than millions of sovjet populations moved in the name of russification of east Europe. Russia or sovjet (not big difference) is like an octopussy. It is in their genes since Gengis Khan, they are nomades trying to adopt their lives to the cities. They still kill people in cities like they did under centuries on the steppes behind the ural mountains where they belongs and where they should be expatriate ASAP.
      Yamal district is big, Magadan is waiting to be populated, Yakustsk needs more workers . Khabarovsk will die without more people. Anadyr welcomes people . So if you love russia. Do something for your country instead of waiting for putin and his croonies to do something for you, because that are not their plans.
      Do you like to see how russia looks like at night ?

    • evanlarkspur

      It only looks that way if you’ve been off-planet for a year, then tuned in only to RT before posting on this forum. No one capable of gathering and processing information thinks Kiev is “the one with blood on their hands.”

  • Charles J. Kollman

    I am confused with what McCain said. Did not McCain go to Kiev and in words support the demonstrations going on there. I guess these were people from the west. So if he supported this how does it play out to be war crimes and against who.

    • Eugene Berkovich

      These were people from Kyiv, the center of Ukraine. Western Ukrainians came to the party too late.

      Besides, there is a big difference between offering moral support (McCain) and invading other countries (Putin).

      • Charles J. Kollman

        Thank you. I know Kyiv and Odessa i was in Ukraine in 2010 March-June. As an American i did not agree or support what McCain and others from America did or were saying. McCain is a US. Senator he Represents a State not America. In matters in America McCain talks now like an ass-hole, it’s time for him to go time has pasted him by. I don’t understand with the situation in Ukraine the EU. does not move and let Ukraine become a member. Also why NATO. does not let Ukraine become part of NATO. I don’t understand why the UN. does not put boots on the ground knowing Russia has invaded. The UN. took action when North Korea invaded South Korea.

        • Eugene Berkovich

          I am a Liberal myself. I am against most things that McCain stands for. But I am for Ukraine’s freedom from Russia. There are many more variables in the East of Ukraine compared to the 1950s Korea.

          1. Russia is a participant, not North Korea or even the 1950s China
          2. Russia is a nuclear state with a large military
          3. Russia is a big player on the oil and gas scene.

          Ultimately, UN would require 6 or more months to get their forces going anyways, even if Russia had agreed (which they will not)

          The West is very carefully trying not to make the conflict larger. What they do not understand, it is already a conflict that has a very large scope.

    • evanlarkspur

      McCain is a people? McCain can go where he pleases and express his support verbally for anything he wishes. However, for those words to represent actions of “the West,” he has to convince the legislative body on which he serves to take official action. They, and thus we, did not.

      • Charles J. Kollman

        McCain is a US. Senator who is one of 100 Senators. McCain Represents a State one of 50 in the USA. A Senator my give an opinion, but a Senator does not Represent The USA. He would also have to convince the House of Representatives and the President. A US. Senator is not God and has rules to go by. If the Patriot McCain had been truly honest with Ukraine McCain would have written a Bill to aid and support Ukraine and have it voted on. Talk is cheap meaning money talks and bull shit walks. You must understand that 97 % of the US. Government are no fucking good and i trust none of them. I see first hand what these progressive liberal socialists and the Muslim Obama are doing to We The People. They are turning The US. into a Police State and at the same time tell Ukraine to be a Democracy this is a joke, because The US. is not a Democracy now or in the past Show me your friends and i will tell you who you are..

        • evanlarkspur

          Um, ok.(?)

          • Charles J. Kollman

            Um,ok. ( ? )=What. As per the Logan Act only The President or someone appointed by The President talks Officially for The US. This authority is given to the Secretary of State. Please take note that any and all treaties the President agrees to must be voted on in The US. Senate and it must get two thirds to pass. Fuck Obama the false President and McCain the false Patriot.

  • ct

    Putin is a nasty war criminal. No doubt about it. He killed hundreds of civilians and made to suffer thousands more just to satisfy his sociopathic arrogance and fascist imperialist delusions. He has no regard for international law, never mind human rights. He is a persona non-grata the world over, except China, North Korea, and Syria. One day he will suffer the same indignities as Muammar Gaddafi…

  • tbrucia

    Meaningless gesture.

    • evanlarkspur

      Meaningless gesture? Only if you believe that the rule of law is a meaningless, empty concept, rather than the bedrock upon which peace, prosperity and democracy are built.

      • tbrucia

        Russia will not pay, no matter what any court decides. Only nations that respect law are affected by it. An outlaw regime doesn’t care about peace or prosperity. It has only contempt for democracy. Anyone thinks actions of any court will influence Putin is living in a dream world.

        • evanlarkspur

          I agree with your assesemt of Russia, just not with an assertion that the trial is utterly meaningless. It is necessary if for nothing else than to ever more seriously show what Russia is, which spurs reluctant politicians and business leaders to finally set aside their own enrichment and distance themselves from a criminal regime.

  • Dean Venture

    I wish the Ukraine well in their endeavour. I doubt very much any action of the court will be relevant to how the conflict is resolved. Cases like this seem to take years to come to their conclusion. Still, I would love to see Russia have to pay for the destruction they’ve wrought, and better yet, warrants issued for those responsible.

    • james mcgeorge

      sadly true, putin will just have less places he can go on holiday.

    • evanlarkspur

      Dean, I agree. But please stop referring to Ukraine as “the Ukraine”. This is essentially a translation of the term Russians use for Ukraine to deprive it of statehood, to imply that it’s just a region (like “the kitchen” or “the yard”), rather than an independent country with a name. Though many English speakers don’t know this, and so don’t use the term with malice, it’s use still has the unwitting effect of helping the Russians deprive Ukraine of respect. It’s “Ukraine.”

      Slava Ukraina!

      • Dean Venture

        My apologies, I am aware of the new sensibilities and I have been trying to change, but for 40-some years it’s been ‘the Ukraine’ over here. The odd definite article will certainly slip out. Please be patient 😉

        • evanlarkspur

          With pleasure! Thanks for your constructive response. I made the same mistake the first time I spoke with a Russian-speaking woman from Donetsk. She corrected me politely, but instantly. I never made that mistake again (and she eventually married me :)

          I hope you will have the opportunity to visit Ukraine when her lands are recovered and her wounds healed. I can promise you the warmest people and the best food, a crazy, heartwarming, horizon-stretching good time that will stand everything you thought you knew on its head. Ukraine has “adopted” me as a foster son, and it has been the adventure of a lifetime. My apartment there is now behind enemy lines, but that’s a temporary state of affairs! Slava Ukraina!

          • Dean Venture

            I would love to visit some day. I really hope you get to return to your apartment soon!

      • Paris Bashta

        Oh, dear… As much as I respect, applaud and share your compassion for the Ukraine, your argument about “the” is not only culturally farfetched and irrational, but also linguistically baseless. Your assumption that the rules for grammar are identically applicable to both Anglo-Germanic and Slavic groups of languages is unfounded and emotional, at best. People of the Ukraine just as people of the United States are each their own proud entities. Overall, most Ukrainians don’t speak English, thus could care less about “the”s, as long as bloody Russians leave them alone so they can live in peace! #СлаваУкраїні! #ГероямСлава!

        • evanlarkspur

          Paris, eta nie pravda. Ya znayu. Ya govoru pah Ruskie, e uh minya yest simyah v Rusiya e Ukraina. I know what I am talking about, and the issue is very real. I made no such assumptions regarding grammar, as I speak basic Russian, but made clear that “the Ukraine” is a translation of how it is said in Russian. As for whether it matters or not, in my very first phone conversation with a Ukrainian women I knew from Donbas, whose primary language is Russian, many years before the current war there, I used the term “the Ukraine” in ignorance. She corrected my firmly, immediately. “The name of my country is Ukraine.” She eventually became my wife. I think I know what I’m talking about. Keep your condescending, ignorant, cock-sure “knowledge” of other people’s language and culture to yourself. You embarrass us both.

          • Paris Bashta

            First off, don’t be rude! It’s very unbecoming! Second off, you completely misunderstood the point of my comment, i.e., linguistic’s nuances aside, Russian aggression on Sovereign Country of the Ukraine is an International Criminal Act on multiple accounts, period! Finally, you don’t know anything about me, hence I’m not quite sure what “you embarrass both of us” and “[my] condescending, ignorant, cock-sure? “knowledge” of other people’s language and culture” inappropriate remarks even mean? Frankly, based on your “politeness” I highly doubt you and I could even remotely belong to some esoteric “us” grouping? Just out of curiosity, where are you from? You said you speak “basic Russian,” you’ve got family in Russia, Ukraine, a Russian-speaking wife from Donetsk and “[you] think [you] know what you’re talking about.” Au contraire, I beg to differ.

  • james mcgeorge

    lets hope putin is removed in a coup rather than dead so he can rot in jail.