After Paris, Putin offers the West a 3-part deal he thinks it can’t refuse, Yakovenko says

This portrait from an art exposition in Moscow in honor of Vladimir Putin's birthday shows the Russian president fighting the multi-headed dragon of leading Western economies. The EU, Japan, and Canada are still alive and fight back using "sanctions," but the US head has already succumbed to Putin's sword. (Image: bbc.com)

This portrait from an art exposition in Moscow in honor of Vladimir Putin's birthday shows the Russian president fighting the multi-headed dragon of leading Western economies. The EU, Japan, and Canada are still alive and fight back using "sanctions," but the US head has already succumbed to Putin's sword. (Image: bbc.com) 

2015/11/19 • Analysis & Opinion, Russia

In the wake of the Paris tragedy, Vladimir Putin, Moscow officials and Russian commentators have precisely duplicated “the classical model of behavior of a racketeer,” pointing out to the West that because “you didn’t want to pay, now look how your store is burning to the ground,” according to Ukrainian commentator Ihor Yakovenko.

But in this case, he says, the West is being called to “pay” with a different kind of currency:

  • First, in Putin’s view, “the West must reject its own principles and chief among them freedom.”
  • Second, “the West must hand over Ukraine to Putin.”
  • And third, “the West must recognize the division of the world into two zones,” one of which is to be governed by Russia.

That may seem like a sweeping conclusion to some, but Yakovenko backs it up with quotations from a wide variety of people in Moscow that suggests if anything he has understated Putin’s idea of a deal. Among them are the following:

  • Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov said that “we hope that the events in Paris will put everything in its place and significantly change the ranking of priorities in Washington and other NATO capitals.”
  • Patriarch Kirill’s protégé, Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin said that after Paris, “the world must forget about tolerance.”
  • Sergey Markov, a member of the Russian Social Chamber, wrote that “it is necessary to end the conflict of Russia and the West as a result of Ukraine. The junta must be replaced by a technical president. The constitution must be changed… the Kyiv junta is one of the main obstacles for the joint struggle of the US, the EU and Russia against terrorism.”
  • Igor Karaulov, a poet and commentator, wrote in “Izvestiya” that “the closing of borders and the introduction of martial law” show the way to the future. If France follows them by electing Marine Le Pen “and sets up a national French government, based on traditional values, then it will be possible to find some solution of the problems presented by migrants.” Zakhar Prilepin, a writer, seconded that opinion. With Le Pen in power, “Russia will have a most powerful ally in Europe and then we will talk.”
  • The writer Eduard Limonov, also in “Izvestiya” said that once again Russians are being asked to “save the world.” The costs will be high but not as high as in World War II, hundreds of thousands of dead rather than millions.
  • Maksim Shevchenko, a Moscow commentator, immediately after the attacks in Paris focused on the Charlie Hebdo case as a way of suggesting that those who had died in Paris had in large measure brought it upon themselves. TV host Dmitry Kiselyov said much the same thing.
  • Moscow political analyst Pavel Svyatenkov was more explicit: he wrote in “Izvestiya” that “France has sowed the wind and is now reaping the whirlwind.”
  • Duma Deputy Irina Yarovaya said on a Sunday talk show that what Russia faces now is “the attack of American anti-democratism” and that just as everyone united against Hitlerism 70 years ago, they will do the same against the American threat.
  • Senator Igor Morozov observed that “since the Americans cannot be the guarantor of security, Russia and Europe must establish a unified Europe, the key link of which is Russia.”
  • Political analyst Dmitry Kulikov insisted that “our fate is Eurasian” and thus Russia must organize “Eurasian security” to include the countries of the Middle East.
  • And orientalist Ruslan Kurbatov said that the news since Paris was good as far as Moscow is concerned: “First, we have seized the initiative from the US, and second, Europe is ready to reach agreement with us.”

Edited by: A. N.

Tags: , ,

  • Brent

    Great example of how Russia fails to understand the Western civilized world and what it stands for . So much delusion in Muscovy!!!

    • Scradje

      Merkel and Hollande have encouraged that delusion. Much, much more sanctions are needed to force the chekists out of Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova. The present sanctions regime is just too feeble. What GOP contender, if any, might make a difference if elected? Rubio maybe?

      • Quartermaster

        Even if the current sanctions regime is maintained, Russia will have a very hard time holding onto anything it has stolen so far. I do agree, however, they are weak and they could be strengthened a lot.

        • Scradje

          I hope you are right.

      • Lana C

        No GOP contender will make a difference, if elected, even if they say so. Congress approved sanctions and Pres. Obama signed. But here is the problem, Europe, has a far more extensive economic relationship
        with Russia than does the U.S. so Europe is the one that can apply sanctions that really hurt Russia so the ball is technically in Europe’s court.

        • Scradje

          As we know, the EU, as represented by kremlin assets Merkel and Hollande, is unwilling to confront putler out of self-interest. Minsk 1&2 were very poor for Ukraine even if the chekist dwarf had complied, which he obviously has not. Only the US could make a difference and Obama has chosen to do as little as possible. Supension from SWIFT, freezing of Russian bank accounts held in certain western cities and severe restrictions on commercial flights are just some of the things that only the US could achieve. A GOP leader is more likely to do that. Although obviously not Trump, as he would be too busy building his wall and playing golf with putler to bother.

          • Lana C

            You are correct in regards to Merkel and Hollande self-interest.
            Cutting Russia off from SWIFT, I believe, would require
            convincing the Europeans to go along. The US did expand the sanctions to include more Russian banks, people and defense companies, and has suspended credit that encourages exports to Russia and financing for economic development projects in Russia. As far as closing commercial air space I truly don’t know much about it and don’t know if EU would have to be involved. If you remember a few months ago a few countries froze Russian assets due to Yokus and this freeze lasted a few days and the assets were unfrozen.
            President Obama had to insist and often times almost
            had to embarrass Europe to stand up and take economic hits to impose costs on Russia.
            In the meantime on September 2015 Holland stated that in
            the light of the recent ceasefire progress, France is hoping to end the sanctions in the near future. Now after the terrorist attack in Paris who knows what Hollande will do. As far as the GOP contenders go they certainly do a lot of barking.
            I think it is way past time for the EU to start doing some of the heavy lifting and as I mentioned EU has a lot more economic ties with Russia than the US.

          • Scradje

            It is indeed way past time, but probably only Britain, Poland and Pribaltika seem to be concerned enough about the issue. France, Germany and Italy are leaning the opposite way. If the Dems continue in power in 2016, nothing will change. Some of the GOP candidates might be a bit more pro-active if elected but it is a long shot. Rubio or Carson maybe?

          • Lana C

            Sorry for the delay in replying. I read in Kiev Post that France, Germany, Italy and the USA will continue the sanctions.
            If you remember, Russia invaded Georgia in 2008 when Bush was President. Bush & Cheney huffed and puffed but Russia continues to occupy Georgian sovereign soil even today. The hotheads Bush/Cheney were in charge in 2008 when Russia did pretty much the same thing. What happened? A lot of bluster and a lot of nothing….If I remember correctly, not even sanctions. So basically they did nothing. However Republicans don’t blame Bush/Cheney for the Georgian invasion nor do I think they should. Blame Russia (Putin/Medvedeff). But now that the same thing has happened in
            Ukraine, Republicans fault President Obama for “emboldening”
            Putin. So the GOP just barks, so I wouldn’t put my hopes on the Republican party to do much.
            Sanctions seem to be working, not as fast as we would like but are working. Now with the terrorist attack in France I heard some French official saying that France is in the middle of USA and Russia and wants USA and Russia to work together. If I was standing near a cliff and Putin was the only one able to save me, I would jump off the cliff. I do not trust Putin he is not an honorable man, in my opinion.

          • Scradje

            Hi Lana. Well I think we agree that the present sanctions regime is way too feeble in relation to the enormity of the crime. I hope that Ukraine will be pursuing RuSSia through the international courts for hundreds of $billions in compensation.
            Re Georgia, Dubya made a catastrophic error of judgement with his fatuous ‘I have looked into his eyes’ comment. This was on a par with FDR’s stupid post war belief that Stalin could be trusted not to annex Eastern Europe. It certainly did encourage Putler to demonize Georgia’s leader, murder Georgians, create thousands of internal refugees and steal 20% of the land of this ancient Christian nation. Because, with the help of Kremlin asset Sarkozy he got clean away with it, he was then able to wait for the right opportunity to expedite the theft of Crimea, which had been planned since at least 2004. So yes, I do partially blame Bush/Cheney for Ukraine, because it was their inaction over Georgia that emboldened Putler to steal more land. Because the response has again been feeble, he may well want to go ahead and steal yet more land. Perhaps this time in Belarus or Pribaltika. He has been able to convert Armenia into little more than a Russian oblast without a shot been fired. Just recently, Kyrgyzstan has also become a vassal.

          • Lana C

            I do agree with you. Bush a few months back was asked about the comment “I have looked into his eyes” and responded “Putin changed”

          • Scradje

            I don’t think he changed at all. It took the bravery of the Georgian and Ukrainian people for the chekist dwarf to finally reveal his fascism and malevolence though. Preferably there won’t be any more Bushes or Clintons in the White House.

  • Michel Cloarec

    Loosers living in utopia = russians !