Polish writer: If US doesn’t arm Ukraine, Putin will move against Baltic countries

Janusz Rolicki, Polish writer and journalist

Janusz Rolicki, Polish writer and journalist 

2015/02/16 • Analysis & Opinion, Featured, Russia

If President Obama follows German Chancellor Merkel and doesn’t arm Ukraine, the US president will not only “be playing the role Putin has assigned to him” but he will also open the way toward an effort by Moscow to dominate the Baltic countries while threatening the world with first use of nuclear weapons, according to Janusz Rolicki.

In a commentary for Warsaw’s “Gazeta Wyborcza,” Rolicki, a senior Polish journalist and commentator, says that the West must stand up to Vladimir Putin both to show him that aggression will not be allowed and that threats of first use of nuclear weapons will not be tolerated.

Putin has openly violated two of the foundations on which the European system has developed over the last half century – a commitment by the powers against any change of international borders by force and a pledge by the nuclear powers not to be the first to use them, Rolicki points out.

Chancellor Merkel’s declaration that she opposes arming Ukraine is „suicide for the European Union as a political player.

These violations are especially troubling at a time when „Putin’s Russia, in formulating a new military doctrine openly introduces in it the principle of the free use of nuclear weapons,” when „flouting international agreements, it has developed a new type of rocket,” and when it carries out exercises and sends out its planes in ways that are consistent with that notion.

„These exercises, like the doctrine itself,” Rolicki argues, „arose out of the complexes the roots of which go back to the 1990s. Russia is flexing its muscles in order to frighten the international community,” and „the world must believe in the decisiveness of a Russia which is prepared to use nuclear weapons for the achievement of its political goals.”

That threat has already born fruit, he continues. „Russia is close to cementing its domination in Ukraine,” as the recent Minsk accords show. No agreement had to be signed, of course, just as no acquirement about „the liquidation of Czechoslovakia” had to be signed in Munich in 1938.

If the West does not begin to arm Ukraine, that will mean condemning that state to be „swallowed up by Russia,” but that Western failure will not end there because Putin will read this as an indication that he can use force and the threat of even more force to get his way and he will move against other of Russia’s neighbors, including the Baltic countries.

Everyone should remember that „if Western politicians after World War II had acted as Frau Merkel and Mr. Hollande are now, the contemporary world would be one big Soviet Union.”

The US has enormous military superiority „over the entire rest of the world,” but „today’s West is incapable of decisive action.” It isn’t even capable of speaking the truth: „Neither NATO nor the EU has yet recognized Russia as an aggressor,” instead following Moscow’s line and called „the so-called separatists” that.

Because the West is not punishing the aggressor in a serious way, Russians are coming to the conclusion that Moscow propagandists are right and that „everything is permitted to the strong.” Indeed, the West isn’t excluding Russia from sports competitions, scholarly exchanges, or meetings.

Putin and his foreign minister Sergey Lavrov „are not subjected to ostracism but treated as statesmen,” despite the fact that they lie in much the same way as Stalin’s prosecutor Vyshinsky or Soviet foreign minister Gromyko, Rolicki says. Moreover, „the West up to now has not shown that it is not afraid of the aggressor.”

Chancellor Merkel’s declaration that she opposes arming Ukraine is „suicide for the European Union as a political player. The second Minsk meetings „showed that this is a path to nowhere” because Putin had already demonstrated that he has no plans to honor any accords that he doesn’t want to.

The US thus must play the key role because the preservation of an independent Ukrainian state requires that Putin hears that if he sends his forces beyond the demarcation line, „NATO will send its forces to Ukraine and if he crosses the Dnepr, [Russian forces] will encounter Western units there.”

Everyone should remember that „if Western politicians after World War II had acted as Frau Merkel and Mr. Hollande are now, the contemporary world would be one big Soviet Union,” Rolicki says.

What is occurring now, he argues, is „the disgusting capitulation of the West and democracy. If NATO and the EU give way to Putin, a real tragedy awaits us, one which will threaten the security of the world” by allowing him to assume that his hands are free to do what he likes.

„It is too bad,” Rolicki concludes, „that Moscow values and respects only crude force. It is horrible that this country has been able to violate the nuclear taboo without being punished. The nuclear issue has returned to our lives and again become a direct threat to the existence of civilization.”

Edited by: A. N.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

  • Czech Friend

    Us Czechs, Poles and Baltics have witnessed the Russian “rule of law” first hand yet are desperate calls are falling on deaf ears in EU and US for they seem to be holding completely different viewpoint.

    The result of those in charge?

    It is obvious that over the past year their efforts to stop Putin have failed and many more Ukrainians have died.
    It is also obvious that would it not be for denying the reality, Europe would have to change its course of action towards Putin. But it didn’t do it even at times of the highest war violence.

    Why? That is the essential question which will decide fate of our leadership when they will be on war tribunal should things spin out of control due to their inaction over these critical past months. Because they had plenty of time do something but chose not to…

    • DejaVu

      Isn’t it ironic after the events in 1956 and 1968 (Budapest and then Prague) that Hungary and the Czech Republic both have administrations and also people who are Russian sympathizers? It seems they have forgotten their own histories. Infact there is also alot of Russian sympathizers and traitors within the EU not just in those countries as well including Nigel Farge in the UK.

      The world has forgotten the lessons of World War I and World War II and as such are doomed to repeat it as World War III.

      • Betty J Rousey

        We in America have been going through that for years now. Nobody remembers the horrors of the depression, so most vote Republican (which is for all the old policies which BROUGHT on the last depression, and almost put us in one in ’08). The poorest whites of Appalachia, all on welfare and food stamps (which the Republicans want to abolish) vote Republican. I don’t know what our entire world is coming to…

        • Mustang-Wanted

          whatever Russian slug. nice try.

          • Betty J Rousey

            Uh, I am an American for Ukraine, responding to DejaVu, and the stupidity of those longing for Russian oppression, completely forgetting all lessons learned or forgotten. Our own right wing Americans, with many of the same characteristics — uneducated, older, rural folks in America, vote against their best interests in the same manner.. YOU sound like the Russian slug, if you’re slinging insults.

          • caaps Ceps

            You may be an american and you may be for Ukraine, but it seems to me that you bring a lot of US partisan issues to your posts.

          • Betty J Rousey

            Are you certain that I am the one who brought the American partisan issues up?

          • Turtler

            Yes, very much so. Please look up the comment string for where American partisan comments started coming in.

            If you have an alternative theory, I would be interested to hear it. Along with a quotation.

          • Oknemfrod

            Yes, just look at your previous post.

            “Our own right wing Americans, with many of the same characteristics — uneducated, older, rural folks in America, vote against their best interests in the same manner.”

            What does it have to do with the Ukrainian issue, especially considering that on this issue, most of the American political class – center-left and center-right stands together?

          • Turtler

            Both of you- including Mustang-Wanted- are slinging insults. Though even as a fellow conservative I do think M-W acts far more like a troll.

            As for the idea that the American right wing has many of the same characteristics, that would be more credible if your own grasp of history didn’t seem patchy.

        • Turtler

          Oh please. The trigger for the Great Recession occurred in the liberal-dominated Freddy Mac and Franny May agencies, where far far far too much loose credit was given. Largely based on the very liberal (and superficially admirable but financially questionable) idea that everybody should be able to own a house regardless of if the bank check worked out.

          You’re also ignoring the fact that the Great Depression- which had been recovering slightly- took a nosedive midway through under FDR’s tenure. Hence what the economic historians refer to as the “Second depression.”

          If you look at the actual timeline of the crash (when the stock took a dive, what was going on before then, et cetera) it paints a very interesting view.

          And if you think the Republicans- or most of them- want to abolish food stamps or welfare (rather than trim them down at best) you haven’t studied much. And are more interested in demonizing than doing research.

          On that front, there has been remarkably little difference between the Democrats and Republicans on welfare policy. To the point where many of the more conservative members (such as me) have griped about it, and FDR even joked about it on campaign. *Seventy Years Ago.*

          • Betty J Rousey

            Regarding food stamps and Republicans, I listen to what the Republican leaders say about it, and the bills being issued at the state level as well as the federal level. But I do have a good grasp of history, as do you. We just interpret it differently. I saw a debt under Clinton which was scheduled to be balanced in 2011, and the next President which gave tax cuts extending to 2011. Never have we started two wars, and had tax cuts. I think you know what the debt skyrocketed up to, and it will remain there, as deficit cutting is not enough. As to the FDR period, many say it was actually WWII which actually brought us out totally. That is not an option for us now, as war profits go those who do not need it, unlike the forties. But a good WPA couldn’t hurt anything, and it might bring a few bridges up to code.

          • Turtler

            “Regarding food stamps and Republicans, I listen to what the Republican
            leaders say about it, and the bills being issued at the state level as
            well as the federal level.”

            As do I. While it is true that members of the GOP make a lot of nosie with varying degrees of honesty and severity against welfare bloat, welfare “bloat”, and the like the “Graham-Palin Kill Social Security Forever” bill died in the committee known as “the wingnuts of the internet.” And the bills that are actually passed are far more traditional, and keeping with the post-FDR status quo (for better or worse).

            “But I do have a good grasp of history, as do you. We just interpret it differently.”

            Indeed, which explains our different opinions.

            “. I saw a debt under Clinton which was scheduled to be balanced in 2011,”

            Whatever that schedule looked like, it must’ve been very interesting indeed.

            While Clinton did cut the national debt by a couple percentage points, he didn’t come close to obtaining, the lows that even Bush I had a few years earlier. By the time his presidency had ending debt redemption had plateaued at rates that would’ve taken decades to pay off at best.

            “and the next President which gave tax cuts extending to 2011. Never have we started two wars, and had tax cuts. I”

            Not true. It’s particularly noteworthy that it was even done int he early days of the Republic, when the US was far mor efragile than t was. Jefferson fought the Quasi War with Republican France and the Barbary Wars against the seaborne Jihadist pirates (to say nothing of miscellaneous frontier conflicts) while cutting the tax rate in accordance with his philosophy.

            Regardless of whether or not that was the wise thing to do, the US didn’t exactly implode. So it can be done, whether or not it should be.

            “I think you know what the debt skyrocketed up to, and it will remain there, as deficit cutting is not enough.”

            On that much we agree.

            “As to the FDR period, many say it was actually WWII which actually brought us out totally.”

            Many say that and there are kernals of truth to it, but actual peacetime GDP (the real measure of wealth) didn’t return until the 1950’s.

            “That is not an option for us now, as war profits go those who do not need it, unlike the forties.”

            Not really, no. Unless we want to say that Henry Ford- the raging anti-semite and Nazi apologist that he was- deserved the wartime profits he earned making B-17s and what note. Ultimately, who “deserves” war profits (and the extent they exist) is a secondary issue at best.

            “But a good WPA couldn’t hurt anything, and it might bring a few bridges up to code.”

            The key problem is how you ensure it would be a Good WPA (rather than a bloated crevice for Pork, like the building of the “Bridge to Nowhere’), and whether there would be enough of a demand for it. We have come a lot further in terms of infrastructure maintenance than we were in the 1930’s, so the question is whether the cost would be worth the benefits.

          • Betty J Rousey
          • Betty J Rousey

            Henry Ford wasn’t the only one making money off the war — his employees, in America, were also. The assembly lines are in other countries now. All the factories which already existed were adapted to making things for war. We have no factories like that anymore. So I should have been more clear. Wartime would increase jobs, of course, but nothing like it did in WWII

          • Betty J Rousey

            As for the WPA, I’ll give you one name which made it worth it, if bridges don’t need fixing, in your opinion — Thomas Hart Benton. This has been interesting. Good bye, now.

        • Oknemfrod

          Look, Betty, your problem seems to be that you’re looking at the issue at hand – to wit, flagrant Russian aggression against its sovereign neighbor, ensuing loss of life and human suffering, and the utter need to arm Ukraine *right now* to prevent more bloodshed and Putin’s incursions – from the angle of R vs D rather than R&D. Note that on the issue of Ukraine being discussed, both parties (in the Congress, anyway) stand unanimously together.
          We can discuss the GD, what brought it about, welfare, food stamps, what the world is coming to, R vs D, etc., ad nauseam in a thread and/or discussion board dedicated to those things.
          Let’s not digress, let’s not use the Ukrainian situation to pitch R against D or vice versa, and focus on how to help Ukraine level the playing field to make any further Putin’s adventures so costly to him and his coterie that maybe, just maybe, it will occur to these international criminals that it’s better for them and their health to mind their business and tend to the Russian internal affairs than expand their crazy imperial “Russian world” vision across their borders via such innocent means as tanks, howitzers, Grads, and economic blackmail. Okay?

      • Czech Friend

        yes unfortuantely, you see Russian totalitarianism is like a cancer that had poisoned several generations in my country and in the Eastern Europe. Majority of Putin/CCCP supporters are old less educated people who fear and despise a life in open society that is complex and on the surface unpredictable compared to life in the concentration camp of dictatorship.

        I see the real danger that many good people in my country no longer see democracy as a core pillar on which a free and prosperous society is built. And this oversight is then easily exploited by non-democrats.

        I can help it but my vision of democracy doesn’t give a “fair” chance to those who want to destroy it. Because I came to realize freedom and democracy means constant struggle and your constant vigilance as much as the good people say otherwise. In my view there is nothing wrong in protecting democracy by force.

        To me Maidan was the greatest victory of democracy and freedom of people against opression in Europe over the last 25 years.

        It wasn’t Putin’s dirty agression and invasion but that silent betrayal of everything Europe and US stands for that hit me so hard.

        • Mustang-Wanted

          Glory to Ukraine!

          • Oknemfrod

            To the Heroes – glory!

        • Gregory Adair

          The leaving Ukraine to such cruel abuse has broken my heart. I am not sure I will ever get over it.

        • Adam Rytwiński

          Dear Czech Friend, soviet ideology was like a cancer, this is true, it has produced so called “homo sovieticus”. But what is strange to me, Czechs and Hungarians had suffered so much from USSR in the latest history (with no excuse after) and we in Poland did not. Now we are as a nation in majority against Russia, as in Czech Republic and Hungary the situation is much different. This is what really surprises me. Maybe I could understand Czechs because of their historical symphaty towards Russia (what is nothing wrong), but I completely don’t understand Hungarians…
          Rgds.

    • Mustang-Wanted

      America won’t have Merkel’s patience. Russia has become a cancer upon this earth.

      • Gregory Adair

        America is no use to anyone until it gets back to keeping peace in the house of democracy. Obama’s foreign policy is malpractice… We might get bye on security matters with a Clinton, but a republican would be better.

    • Gregory Adair

      Czech Friend,

      The Europeans *always* believed in “diplomacy” and talking points while their house burned down. Always. I mean, that is the history of modern Europe. Never mind 1938 and 1939, just look at the Balkans in the 1990’s… Did “Europe” end that massacre without a US intervention, weapons, and gunboat diplomacy? No! Sorry to be so blunt.

      In the US, most common people basically do not respect Europe with regards to defense issues, because ordinary Americans had to go fight over there 2 times in the 20th century to bail them out, millions of Americans died for them, and the Europeans still today do not provide for their own security. (We go easier on Britain)…It’s pathetic. It is not — as ungenerous Europeans sometimes assert — that Americans are brutish and aggressive. It is that Americans take security seriously, are practical, and do not have patience for bizarre philosophic solutions where nobody is armed. The only Americans with such ideas are Obama and his NS Advisor Susan Rice, who both are basically a joke. Europeans openly dismiss and insult us, but they rely on us for protection. For this reason transatlantic relations are often strained . You may view the infamously candid Victoria Nuland comment last year — “f- Europe” — in this light, as an expression of the frustration Americans often have felt. I must wonder what the uncensored opinions regarding Merkel and Hollande were in the Washington last week?

      About Putin and Ukraine, there are 3 factors making America “gun shy” and avoidant right now. One is “nuclear Russia”; approach with caution. Two is the **extremely** unusual foreign policy mind called Barrack Obama. He thinks the world will not burn down if America dis-engages from security threats. (ISIS is quickly destroying that ridiculous theory). Third, another factor, for the American people themselves, is actually being tired of wars. Just tired. America, by success, wealth, and broad extension of its military power, got stuck with a never-ending chain of conflicts from 1941 to …1990s. You hear left-thinking people speak as though America is a big empire extracting benefit from all over the world. But it is more like hundreds of bases we pay for and staff with 100s of thousands of soldiers, tons of international responsibilities, and high taxes to keep making weapons. For Americans, power is experienced as a huge responsibility, not a privelege.

      Post 1990, just in time for a pause, came the ultimate meltdown of the Middle East , and Al Quaeda in 2001. Bad US policy made the Iraq situation a major mess that is not over. In any case, the US got 14 years of very hard wars. Put simply, Americans are now tired and prefer to stay home. Obama got elected while people were in this mood (and Putin knows this)…….Next up, Putin invades Ukraine. The first problem, frankly, Americans did not really know where Ukraine is. And because they do not want to go to war very much in general, they are — so far — not marching in the street demanding to go confront Putin. Obama is now banking on getting all the way though 2016 while sitting on his hands doing as little as possible in Ukraine. It is plain as day.

      The failure to defend Ukraine by the West cannot be blamed on Merkel. She is a European, and a pacifist, Putin just laughs at her. No, once again, why not jut blame America. Or rather…. I blame Obama. To me, the US is the only adult in the big room here. Just as the US will have to lead actions to deal with ISIS, the US will have to arm and train Ukraine. It is inevitable. Talk of Europe standing up to Putin are basically absurd; there is no good precedent for it except Great britain in WW2. Anybody can tell you this, except Obama. I personally wish we would just cut the song-and-dance, tell Merkel to attend to her business in Berlin, and ship arms and trainers to Lviv en-masse. Then get on with what needs to be done. This will come late. Obama will drag it out to the very end.

      • Milton Devonair

        Very good post Greg.
        I only differ with our president obola. He’s a liberal/progressive, so adores all things european socialistic and in thought. So he, like most europeans, blame most of the bad things in the world on the USA. I’ve read it here, in people angry at putin/russia and in favor of Ukraine, they say things like the “US wars” (gulf war 1 and 2, afghanistan, and the balkan war).

        So little barackie and the europeans think the world would be better off w/o the US always starting things, wanting to steal other people’s oil, etc. So little barack has just just remove the US from the world’s stage.

        Now the world sees what the world is like when the USA stays at home.

        • Gregory Adair

          thanks Milton. it is not good guys versus bad guys. But even if I used to object a lot to my own US Government’s policies, at a certain point, you look out and see the Soviet, Putin, ISIS, and in various instances it is just clear that we are the less-bad. I think people living in big successful democracies are too spoiled, and start saying silly things, very silly moral equivalencies…

          • Milton Devonair

            Yup. So these europeans that have always blamed the USA for “intervening” or “meddling” into other countries, comparing us to soviet russia or any number of @sshole dictators/muslims, well, they will now get to experience the other side and see if there USA is just like putin/russia and Christian Americans are just like muslims.

            Time for them to start anteing up as the game has not only started, but it’s been going on for a while now. They’re just getting the memo…….

  • StumpedNoMore2

    The Poles are very smart people. They call it for what it is — Russian invasion of Ukraine. In the Kyiv Post, I have stated that Ukraine should stick with Poland and the Baltic States when they are in the EU block because these countries will have the best interest of Ukraine. They know first hand what the Russian can do to them just like how Ukraine is experiencing this injustice at the moment.

    I have read yesterday that the Poles are spending an enormous amount of money in upgrading their military due to the threat of the Russian. So the West must not be idle while Putin is breaking every agreements that he had agree upon. Ukraine, the Baltic States, and Poland needs to be supported as they are moving in the right direction.

    Source: http://news.yahoo.com/poland-kicks-off-unprecedented-military-spending-spree-005930875.html

    • sandy miller

      America is not going to send arms to Ukraine. Obama has been stalling and continues to do so. Ukraine’s only hope is for all the friendly countries to get together put boots on the ground in Ukraine and stop Putin themselves. Hopefully, if he decides to use nuke’s the world will step in. Everyone knows sooner or later he may wait for another year or he’ll have to find an excuse or maybe not to step into one of the baltics or Poland. Unfortunately, the EU is dead!!!! The propagandists have won.

      • StumpedNoMore2

        You might be correct Sandy. I am still hoping that the Ukrainian people get the help that they need. Ukraine is not asking for boots on the ground in their country but they are asking for defensive weapons to defend their country.

        It is frustrating to see the Iraqi given high tech weapons and out-numbering ISIS on a good number of times but have no will to fight for their country. The reason why ISIS have sophisticated weapons is because the Iraqi abandoned their position even though they outnumbered ISIS in Mosul last year. The Kurds have shown courage and bravery against ISIS more than the Iraqi.

        The Ukrainians have stood toe to toe with the Russians for a year and they have not lost that much ground compare to the Iraqi. In addition, the Kremlin-led insurgents have gotten better weaponry and Ukraine have been able to hold its own. Those are the qualities that I have respect towards them and their courage to save their homeland from their aggressive neighbor.

        • Betty J Rousey

          A spokesman for Ukraine was interviewed on one of our U.S. shows, and he said that if we (America) were too averse to sending weapons, what Ukraine REALLY needed were electronics — they are still using walkie-talkies from WWII — so there are plenty of things we in the U.S. could send to give strategic advantage even if it weren’t truly weapons. But you must remember, our Republican party (the anti-Communist party) LOVES Putin. Nobody knows why, exactly, except that we in America have an ideological battle going on which has no end that I can foresee. But I am for UKRAINE and its independence! I am against any country invading another, including when we invaded Iraq for money… And I, too, believe that Putin has much bigger plans than just the taking of Ukraine. He must be stopped.

          • Roman Sverdetsa

            Betty,I am a American and a Republican and you are FOS

          • Betty J Rousey

            From you, I consider that a supreme compliment. Thank you, Mr. Republican.

          • Turtler

            In that case, consider me doing the same.

            That being said, I do agree with you on the general concepts. Especially Ukrainian freedom.

          • StumpedNoMore2

            Going into Iraq and Libya have been a big mistake for us. Iraq should have been split into three countries after the end of colonialism because of the three factions: shiite, Sunni, and Kurds.

            We have made poor mistakes in the past but we need to stand with the Ukrainian people like you stated. The Republicans have been very vocal about their support of the Ukrainian people so I cannot agree with you on that. I am neither Republican nor democrats but just an independent.

            George Washington warned us about the influence of political parties.

          • Mustang-Wanted

            another Russian pretending to be American, hilarious.

          • StumpedNoMore2

            Said the guy with 16 posts with half of them being deleted. The only troll on here is you. Looking at most of your posts, it is nothing but accusation about other people being trolls. Please enlighten us with your word of wisdom or I can educate you back since the beginning of the Revolution in 1776.

          • Oknemfrod

            What is it in what StumpedNoMore2 has said you are taking umbrage at? Not to mention that during the fairly long time I’ve followed his comments, I’ve never seen any attempt by him to “pretend” to be American, nor any inclination on his part to support the putinoid cause – quite to the contrary. If he is a Russian (which I very much doubt), he must be commended for having learned English well enough to go undetected from the linguistic point of view. Try it the other way around, and let’s see how you fare in comparison.

          • http://www.facebook.com/anthony.carl.caudill Anthony Caudill

            Shiite Iraq would be assimilated by Iran, putting it in contact with Saudi Arabia. A no-go for us.

          • Turtler

            “Going into Iraq and Libya have been a big mistake for us.”

            With all due respect, I don’t think so. Two terror supporting regimes were destroyed, and as bad as they are now the slaughter has actually diminished.

            ” Iraq should have been split into three countries after the end of
            colonialism because of the three factions: shiite, Sunni, and Kurds.”

            Not that easy. Especially since the Sunni and the Shia live almost on top of each other in many places because of the long, looooong game of arse grab the Ottoman Empire and the Persians played.

          • Milton Devonair

            Remember that we were told over and over there were no WMDs in Iraq……nor any terrorist training centers there.
            Desert Storm 1 and 2 were UN mandates, thus the coalition troops used in both.
            The UN also sanctioned ‘war’ in Afghanistan to rid the country of being a training ground for terrorists. (UN resolutions: 1378, 1383, 1368, 1373)

            So all of these ‘wars’ are sanctioned by the UN and have coalition troops in them….but europeans, communists, socialists, and liberal/progressives always think it’s just the mean old US of A that invades other countries…..for very strange reasons, like to “steal their oil (iraq) and for Afghanistan, I have no idea of their reasoning why “America waged war on them”.

            The more I read about Ukraine, the more I want the US to not only get out of the UN, but nato also. The eu should be the new nato.

            We should also get out of ASEAN. Let australia, thailand, japan and south korea run that group as like europe, they’re a loooong way from the US.

          • Turtler

            I agree, the UN is corrupt as the devil and long past replacing. And the US has been a punching bag for far too long.

            But that being said, I don’t think we should be throwing away NATO so easily. While there are a huge number of corrupt and do nothing members, it’s still better to have them (like Greece and Cyprus) at least nominally on our side than it is to risk running them off to Russia.

            “We should also get out of ASEAN. Let australia, thailand, japan and south korea run that group as like europe, they’re a loooong way from the US.”
            Mainland US yes. But not Hawaii and the Pacific territories. And while Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and South Korea are far closer, they have nowhere near the sort of maritime power we have. And there are a lot of sharks in those waters……

          • Milton Devonair

            I don’t think the UN should be replaced, I think it should be eliminated. Let the eu be the european un. Let some african group be the african un. Let some asian group be the asian un.

            The world needs to separate out, become more localized and less ‘global’.

            That way, each group can choose what they value, then place their energy and monies there.
            That’s the ultimate ‘democracy’ and what everyone says the world needs more of. More power locally and less globally.

          • Turtler

            “I don’t think the UN should be replaced, I think it should be
            eliminated. Let the eu be the european un. Let some african group be
            the african un. Let some asian group be the asian un.”

            A: Having there be only regional UNs would defeat the point of having a UN at all.

            B: There already are somethings approaching an African and Asian “UN’. See the AU and ASEAN. They haven’t worked out.

            “The world needs to separate out, become more localized and less ‘global’.”

            At this point I don’t see it. If some of the local morons still yabber about how the US/West doesn’t have an interest in shoring up Ukraine against a totalitarian’s pet project, how will reorganizing the world so that they have more of a point work?

            There’s a reason we moved beyond localization, and why people try to break out of it as much as possible. Because it isn’t the best thing to live in. India and China would be at a fraction of what they are now without an American scientist’s Green Revolution. Ukraine would have even less hope for help than it does now. How does that help any attempt to form a common cause?

            “That way, each group can choose what they value, then place their energy and monies there.”

            Assuming they have the right to do so.

            “That’s the ultimate ‘democracy’ and what everyone says the world needs more of. More power locally and less globally.”

            Are these “everyone” also Subsaharan Africans dying en masse from Malaria, sickle cell, and the like? Ukrainian fighters screaming for Western aid against an evil enemy?

            Somehow, i doubt it.

          • Milton Devonair

            “Having there be only regional UNs would defeat the point of having a UN at all.”
            Excellent point my dear Sir.
            What exactly is the point of the UN anyway?
            They went to Iraq, following their many mandates about getting rid of Saddam, then after one explosion by their office, they fled the country.
            Was it they or the osce or whoever they are that were going to go to a city in eastern Ukraine, only to stop short because there was fighting going on there. So they will do what they always do, go into a place after the US or some other countries kill and be killed enough in that spot to make it safe for them. Then they’ll go in and pass some meaningless judgement that no one gives a sh*t about.
            Then ask for more money from the US.

            China is only advanced because of it’s fascist state and abundance of people, thus it’s an economic giant, but pale in everything else. Same with india, but their main advantage is they speak English.

            The US can’t keep paying the bills of the world in cash, blood, and our youth. And on top of that, to be treated like we are some evil imperialists by the socialists were are supposed to be saving/helping? Crazy.

            Many of the US Vets have experienced many years of helping people that don’t want to help themselves. I can tell you that for a fact, over two generations. I talk to them every day.

            will break up the response for easier reading.

          • Milton Devonair

            [That way, each group can choose what they value, then place their energy and monies there.]

            “Assuming they have the right to do so.”

            So whose job is it to give other people in other countries their rights? The US? Isn’t us doing that what the europeans always b*tch about us doing? Or they say we Americans aren’t doing that, we’re just there to steal their oil or just like to kill babies or some other BS.

            I’ve constantly said that other countries should let their citizens have firearms like we do in the US. That would be a wonderful way to empower the locals in their quest to be free. The people of that country could be the first line of defense in fighting for their freedom.

            But for that europeans call people like me in America “rednecks” (only a pejorative to socialist types) and “uneducated” and need to stop that way of thinking. So we are trying to EMPOWER individuals in other countries while the europeans are trying to remove power from individuals in America so we can be as helpless as the people in their countries.
            Make sense? I know, crazy, but that’s the logical outcome of decades of leftist programming in schools and the media/entertainment.

            Why should we send people with guns to your country if your country doesn’t allow your citizens to have guns? So they can watch us fight and die for them? Then insult us about it later? Or while doing it?

          • Jens A

            Going into Libya was done by Europe and not the US and it failed. Maybe not because it was wrong that we did it, as mass murder was in the making, but because we didn’t finish the job and stabilized the new government and now we risk mass murder. Not really a success! As for Iraq, I live in a country where we supported that war long after it was very unpopular in the US, but personally I never supported it. I think the Iraq war diverted our attention away from Afghanistan at a time where we had a golden opportunity to succeed in that country and when we finally did pay attention, the opportunity was gone. We will pay dearly for that and we already have!

            I sure hope that we learn from our mistakes! Not to help Ukraine NOW, would be a BIG mistake!

          • Milton Devonair

            “Going into Libya was done by Europe and not the US”

            Libya was the result of UN Resolution 1973. The US and UK fired over 161 US made Tomahawk missiles ($1.4million each) that destroyed the command, control and air defense systems of Libya, enabling the air from other european countries to enter their airspace.
            It failed because there was no ‘after plan’, just like why the UN Resolutions to invade Iraq failed.

            UN Resolution 1441 called for the invasion and overthrow of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq because the following, previous UN resolutions were ignored by Saddam Hussein:
            660, 661, 678, 686, 687, 688, 707, 715, 986 and 1284.

            And all the while, the UN officials were making tens of millions in cash breaking their own resolutions by trading oil with an embargoed Iraq.

          • Jens A

            Get away from my comments. I don’t want to read what you write.

          • Milton Devonair

            Don’t read them then. Other people read what I write.
            This is more than just about you.

          • Jens A

            He is not serious. Don’t waste time on him.

          • Mustang-Wanted

            this is classic Kremlin playbook lies. Always delivered the same way. go away.

          • StumpedNoMore2

            This is classic trolling. Just accusing everyone that doesn’t agree with your views but yet you have not even provided us with any insightful comments at all.

            You’re just like Pete Carroll passing the ball on the goal line instead of giving the ball to Marshawn Lynch to run it in for a touchdown.

          • John Shirley

            Please don’t blame all Republicans. I have supported that party for my entire adult life, and I can say with complete honesty that I hate Putin and his role in this war, with a vengeance.
            Also, take a look a McCain, if it were up to him, Ukraine would already have enough high tech weapons that they could destroy Russia in a blink of an eye.

          • Jens A

            McCain is a good man! No doubt about it, at least not from my point of view! But in general, Europeans don’t like the Republicans and neither do I for real, but your party for sure delivered a couple of very good presidents and candidates when the question is international politics and here I think of Reagan and McCain. Both not very hard core republicans.

          • Milton Devonair

            So on one hand you are the typical european that hates the US when it intervenes in wars in other countries while on the other hand are the same european that wants the US to intervene in wars in other countries?

            If you aren’t understanding that, I hope other euros reading that now can appreciate how Americans view europeans they way they do because that is what we get, what we see, what we hear.

            America broke down the russian soviet empire and freed all of europe.
            Now it’s time for your europeans to keep yourselves free. You’ve been free to do this since 1991.

          • Jens A

            Get away from my comments. I don’t want to read what you write 2.

          • Tim Chrisolm

            Betty, you seem to have overlooked the fact that the US congress approved the Ukraine Freedom and Support Act unanimously. If you believe that Republicans LOVE Putin then you must understand that Putin LOVES Obama’s weakness. Who do you think is standing in the way of arming Ukraine? Hint: He’s not a Republican. Are we clear on that yet?

          • Betty J Rousey

            Well, of course it is Obama’s fault… regardless, right? And I think what you are saying is that the Republicans love Putin because Putin and Obama dislike one another. “The enemy of my enemy…” quote. However Obama plays it, he will end up helping Ukraine in the best way for all, not just some knee-jerk reaction to “look good.” Just watch and learn from a master. He has faced you guys without flinching for six years now, he has practice,

          • Gregory Adair

            Betsy that logic is silly about “the enemy of my enemy”. Obama does not like Putin, Republicans don’t like Obama….The problem is Obama’s indiference and laziness, and his worldview. While the world is burning Obama is playing golf.
            Putin has wooed a very odd political culture across the planet. In Europe it goes from very old lefties with Soviet nostalgia syndrome; Germans with postwar guilt ( they oddly exclude Ukrainians from this — of whom 5 million killed in WW2); neo-fascist far rightists in Europe (LePenn in France, Orban in Hungary, Greek neo nazis called “Golden Dawn”, and … who did I miss?)
            In the US, Putin DOES have apologists; same old lefties (the professor, I think Steven Cohen and others); Old-left apologists in ‘The Nation’ magazine; washed up actors like Steven Segal, and (this is the most important) the Cultural Right a-la Patrick Buchanan. Putin has a big appeal to some hardcore culture warriors. There is a very potent connection between 1) those who admire Putin’s anti-gay, anti-feminist, anti-liberal, (anti-freedom, basically) idea of culture, and 2) the node within the Republican base who are hardcore isolationists and think Putin should be given Europe (and presumably ISIS given the mideast) – Rand Paul. There are also a couple of major PR firms with Republican connections carrying water for Brand Putin from US offices.
            Regardless, in the US, the foreign policy tradition is international strength and measured responsibility within both parties. Obama’s pacifist/isolationist head-in-the-sand non-policy is VERY a-typical for the last century. It is no accident that he is being abandoned by even most democrats on foreign matters. The mainstream of the Republican Party would have faced off with Putin a year ago and we would not be talking about this.

          • http://www.facebook.com/anthony.carl.caudill Anthony Caudill

            Georgia, anyone?

          • Tim Chrisolm

            LOL A master—That’s the most ridiculous thing EVER printed. A master LMFAO. A community organizer with ZERO experience is a master. Good God. He is THE weakest, most incompetent, embarrassing leader any nation EVER had. Putin has manhandled Obama. First off, when Obama said “The military option is off the table” that was one of the biggest screw ups of all time. Having served during the cold war myself (did you serve Betty?)it’s common military knowledge that you NEVER tell the enemy what you’re NOT gonna do. A “master” would not have made such a blunder. And FYI, this very day, Ukraine lost Debaltseve. But that’s in their best interest though, right? Mariupol will probably be the next to fall into Russia’s hands. Is the master gonna draw another red line? Right. “And this time I REALLY, mean it. Last time I meant it too, but not REALLY. But this time I REALLY mean it. You see me waggin my finger right?That’s a sure sign that I REALLY mean it.”

          • Turtler

            If anything, Obama and his party have been far, far more concillatory and supportive of Putin than the Republicans on the whole. For various reasons, not all of them tied into moral superiority (any- Any- opposition party will give flak to a sitting party’s policies, for good or for ill).

            Again, compare the most damning symbolic gestures. Bush: “Looking into Putin’s Soul” and assuming he was a partner that could be dealt with.

            Obama: Unilateral “reset.” And several more concessions.

            “However Obama plays it, he will end up helping Ukraine in the best way
            for all, not just some knee-jerk reaction to “look good.””

            What. Seriously?

            What way would that be?

            Look on the rest of the website. Obama and his allies have been the target of a lot of flak (both justified and not_ precisely because those most invested in the conflict think his aid is not doing enough. Especially with his endorsement of a ceasefire even as it was broken, and instance that there is no military solution in spite of historical precedent proving otherwise (Case in point: Operation Storm).

          • Oknemfrod

            >However Obama plays it, he will end up helping Ukraine<

            Ain't holding my breath. If he's such an eager beaver, why hasn't he yet? 5000+ Ukrainians are dead, close to 1 million displaced. Is he waiting for an opportune moment when those figures have doubled or tripled? The Congress – unanimously – has given him everything he needs a long time ago. Too long.

          • Turtler

            “our Republican party (the anti-Communist party) LOVES Putin. Nobody
            knows why, exactly, except that we in America have an ideological battle
            going on which has no end that I can foresee”

            What? Seriously?

            As a card carrying Republican and staunch Neocon, I certainly haven’t seen that be popular. Outside of a few extremely whacked out “Paleocons” like Buchanan and Trifkovic with minute pull, those I have heard of have been uniformly critical about him. To the point where we (the GOP) were stigmatized as being the “Cold Warriors”, including Romney (our old candidate) identifying Russia as the greatest strategic enemy of the US during the last election.

            This isn’t to say that the Republican party does not have its’ issues, and it is true that Bush was the one who supposedly looked into his soul and thought he saw a worthwhile partner. But he also ramped up support to Georgia. And Obama was the one who pushed the “reset” button, scrapped missile defense for Poland, and countless others.

            “including when we invaded Iraq for money…”

            You have the right to be opposed to invading another country, but you do not have the right to have your own version of reality. We did not invade Iraq for money. We barely got any out of it.

            Please study the Gulf War ceasefire and the justifications for the invasion. Almost all of which were proven true (including the WMD, though it was wildly exaggerated) and *only one of which* was justification for a ground war.

      • Mustang-Wanted

        Russian troll. back to RT.

        • canuke

          Huh? Sandy a RuSSian troll? I’ve followed her posts for a year, and guarantee you that she is 110% Ukrainian and a patriotic American.

      • http://www.facebook.com/anthony.carl.caudill Anthony Caudill

        Prediction: Merkel falls in next election, as do other pro-Russia governments.

      • Adam Rytwiński

        Don’t panic sis 😉

  • Dirk Smith

    Poland and Canada have discussed lethal aid for Ukraine. Just do it!!

    • Gregory Adair

      There’s a point!!! Canada — with the world’s largest Ukrainian diaspora — should spearhead the lethal aid move. The US is saddled with Obama. Harper could break this open. Why not get Poland and Canada together , and drag the US in behind? Canadian MPs: PAss Measures to ship lethal aid to Poland and Ukraine!

  • Sirko

    There’s a cheaper way. replace Lenin with Putin, or better still, lay him next to the rotting carcass.

  • James Matkin

    I disagree. I believe escalating confrontation with military weapons from
    US is counterproductive risking world war. The Ukraine is not a member of NATO and is by geography and history within Russia’s sphere of influence. “Looked
    at with the lenses of “offensive realism” according John Mearsheimer, “The
    Tragedy of Great Power Politics” 2001, leaves one pessimistic that the tragedy
    unfolding with the Russian invasion of Ukraine will end well. We are witnessing
    firsthand the growing split in the West over more military involvement by the
    US. Mearsheimer’s realism is based on the fact war will occur because states
    pursue power under our “anarchic system” with no hierarchy or “night watchman”
    to sort out things when one state attacks another. My comment NY Times Feb. 09. Unfortunately realism means that the tragedy of major countries is they

    In negotiations, justice is not an objective standard because
    there is no judge or arbitrator of what is fair and therefore parties must
    accept that any lasting final deal negotiated will respect the relative
    equality or inequality of power between the combatants.

    “This is the justice of power, the right of might or of other endownments. In international
    relations, as in other areas, sharing is not – and is not expected to be – on a
    numerically equal basis but on the basis of acquired inequality. More is
    expected by larger states, or more powerful states, or by littoral states or by
    nuclear powers, or by victorious states, or by whichever party illustrates the
    axiom, ‘To those who have it shall be given.” (Zartmann 104)

    Justice is what the parties believe to be “fair”. Justice is then fashioned by the parties (sui
    generis) without the benefit of any compelling external review. There is no third
    party to judge or legislate what is fair. Fairness is only an ideal in the
    minds of the parties. It is accepting that “right is might” within limits
    preventing anarchy. The limits are mostly
    set by externalities; therefore, in the case of Ukraine if Russia pushes its
    dominant power too far this may trigger unwanted escalation beginning with
    direct lethal aid from the US.

    Russia justifies its aggression in Crimea because the
    revolution in Kiev unseating Viktor Yanukovych was unconstitutional as
    Yanukovych being a democratically elected leader. Yes, he was unpopular because of his “rampant corruption, lawlessness and autocracy” and the Maidan protests had widespread,
    moderate grassroots support but the remedy for such misfeasance is both civil
    prosecution and defeat at the ballot box, not revolution.

    But two wrongs do not make a right so if the Kiev protestors
    pushing Yanukovych out of office are illegally under the constitution how does
    this justify Russia taking action that breaches the fundamental principle of
    international law that a nations boundaries must not be changed by force?

    “After all, Putin, in opposing U.S. intervention in other countries, has
    said repeatedly that foreign intervention can be justified only with the
    approval of the United Nations Security Council. Perhaps this is the real
    reason Putin is pretending that there is no military intervention in Crimea.
    But who is he fooling? Even his strongest supporters understand that thousands
    of Russian troops have left their naval base in Sevastopol and have seized
    Crimean installations. The other problem is if Putin wants to rely on legal
    arguments, he will have trouble explaining why Russia should not abide by the
    1994 Budapest Memorandum, which guarantees Ukraine’s territorial integrity.” Michael Bohm is opinion page editor of The
    Moscow Times.

    • Turtler

      “I disagree. I believe escalating confrontation with military weapons from
      US is counterproductive risking world war.”

      You are welcome to disagree. The problem is that that was the sort of logic that helped weaken us ad make the second world war that much more devastating. In the end you kill a fire by putting it out or choking it of “food.”

      We have less of a risk by drawing the line as far away as possible than we do hoping Putin changes his behavior.

      As for the ruminations on Justice, while some degree of that cynicism is warranted, the degree of subjectivism isn’t. By that logic the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact was “justice” because the parties involved (Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union) saw it as “fair.”

      “in the case of Ukraine if Russia pushes its
      dominant power too far this may trigger unwanted escalation beginning with
      direct lethal aid from the US.”

      It’s already pushing its’ dominant power too far. Shamelessly ripping up international agreements and the history books alike is not the behavior of a responsible partner. It needs to be punished if only to show that deterrence is there.

      “Russia justifies its aggression in Crimea because the
      revolution in Kiev unseating Viktor Yanukovych was unconstitutional as
      Yanukovych
      being a democratically elected leader. Yes, he was unpopular because
      of his “rampant corruption, lawlessness and autocracy” and the Maidan
      protests had widespread,
      moderate grassroots support but the remedy for such misfeasance is both civil
      prosecution and defeat at the ballot box, not revolution.”

      This is a fundamental misreading of what happened in the Maidans.

      The Maidans started out as constitutionally protected free demonstrations, as the citizens of any state have the natural right to do. Obviously, Yanu did not like having a massive opposition force gathering strength because he remembered what happened last time during the Orange-Blue faceoffs. So he started trying to disband them more and more.

      Eventually, he decided to escalate to the point of unconstitutional measures, including deploying paramilitary, extra-legal forces to crush the demonstrators (Even when they were peaceful), and ultimately trying to deploy the military to wipe them out. Only for them to laugh in his face.

      These actions are Deeply Illegal and Unconstitutional. The second Yanukovych chose to do it, his legitimacy under the Ukrainian constitution was null and void. Removing him at that point was absolutely lawful, for the same reason it would be le gal to overthrow any other usurper, initial democratic legitimacy or not. Which is why even his support base evaporated.

      The irony is that if Putin or Yanu had put the brakes on sooner or later- Putin to forcing his puppet to do a spectacularly unpopular move, Yanu taking subtler steps to divide and remove Maidan without resorting to ham handed tactics, etc- they would probably be in far stronger positions than they are now.

      But c’est la guerre.

      Of course, this is something that is conveniently overlooked. Particularly because so few people have looked at the Ukrainian constitution.

      “The other problem is if Putin wants to rely on legal
      arguments, he will have trouble explaining why Russia should not abide by the
      1994 Budapest Memorandum, which guarantees Ukraine’s territorial integrity.”

      Putin has never relied on legal arguments for anything more than superficiality. He rules through brute force, and will continue to do so.Ultimately, it will require some level of brute force to bring him down.

      Hopefully, supporting the Ukrainians to do this and his domestic opposition will help that.

      • Milton Devonair

        ‘Helping a family defend themselves against a criminal gang can only make the criminal gang mad, so we shouldn’t’ is the logic that account and other pro russia accounts use.

        The US/eu have done nothing to help Ukraine other than give them biscuits, blankets and some money to give to russia, trying to buy peace.

        putin the chimpanzee knows that as do the most of the world. Which is why he mocks Ukraine and the world when he told world reporters of his continued invasion, Debaltseve, “Of course it’s always a hardship when you lose to yesterday’s miners
        or yesterday’s tractor drivers. But life is life. It’ll surely go on.”

        putin the russian ape sh*ts on the world and the world just ignores it, just glad he is not targeting them and glad that they get their gas/money fix from his corrupt, criminal cesspool.

        russia is a disease
        russia is ebola
        russia kills human civilization…..

        • Turtler

          “The US/eu have done nothing to help Ukraine other than give them
          biscuits, blankets and some money to give to russia, trying to buy
          peace.”

          Sadly yes. But that alone shouldn’t be discounted too much. It’s hard to fight a war when you’re hungry, starving, and out of funds. The OUN and Khmelnitskiy’s heirs found that out the hard way.

          That doesn’t mean it should stop there though.

          “putin the chimpanzee knows that as do the most of the world. Which is
          why he mocks Ukraine and the world when he told world reporters of his
          continued invasion, Debaltseve, “Of course it’s always a hardship when
          you lose to yesterday’s miners
          or yesterday’s tractor drivers. But life is life. It’ll surely go on.””

          Agreed.

          putin the russian ape sh*ts on the world and the world just ignores
          it, just glad he is not targeting them and glad that they get their
          gas/money fix from his corrupt, criminal cesspool.”

          Which is why those of us whoa re willing to stand up and fight him must do it. For the common cause.

          • Milton Devonair

            What europe may find out is the “common cause” is their own individual freedom and liberty. However, I don’t think europeans have ever understood that as they’ve always been governed by a strong, central power/person that runs/regulates most of the aspects of their individual lives.

            The common good for europe will be for ALL europeans to be free….and Ukraine is a part of europe. 😉

          • Turtler

            “What europe may find out is the “common cause” is their own individual freedom and liberty. However, I don’t think europeans have ever understood that as they’ve always been governed by a strong, central power/person that runs/regulates most of the aspects of their individual lives.”

            Not really true. Just look at classical Athens, or the Renaissance/Medieval communes. especially Renaissance Italy and Switzerland. The medieval Lombard republics and Swiss cities are as good a demonstration of any that Europeans haven’t always been governed by a single strongman. And they helped inspire our idea of individual freedom and liberty.

            Ones that helped inspire the English thinkers that formed the British constitution, and in turn sparked the American Revolution. The problem has been the excessive reach of the state (something that the French Revolution did anything but fix), and the lack of a realization that just because the state *can* interfere in no way means it *Should.*

            The common good for europe will be for ALL europeans to be free….and Ukraine is a part of europe. ;-)”
            Exactly my thoughts.

          • Milton Devonair

            I must have mis-spoke. I wasn’t saying that ALL of europe followed one govt/king/queen, rather europe was just land filled with tribes that put their lives under a person/king/queen/knight and later, that morphed into a form of more formal governance.

            Europe has always been tribal, thus ya’ll have always been at war with each other, so it was necessary for survival to live under that strong governance–in exchange for the freedoms given up, you will be provided with safety.

            The founding of the US was just the opposite–a wide open space with hardly anyone in it, so there was no need for a strong government. Thus our founding documents put the individual first–the only one in the history of the world.

            That’s the basic, inherent difference between Americans and Europeans and it’s reflective in our thinking, our cultures and I see it on this board, so it’s still in existence.

    • Gregory Adair

      I disagree with your dismissal of the Ukraine Maidan… .

      Most have by now read and studied Mearshimer’s arguments from the Realist perspective, echoed by Kissinger, and even Scowcroft. The problem with this older way of looking at international affairs is that it presumes inevitabie of spheres of influence, denies agency to smaller powers, and wrongly places “right” with might, rather than a justified order of close correlation to the interests of citizens in an emergent democratic expression. Kissinger and Mearshimer would both warn off confrontation with Russia, viewing its ability to control Ukraine with “right”. This is an backwards and defeatist philosophy. It is also anarchic. They would not have been able to comfortably describe the world of 1939 under that theory. But 1939 is far closer to the situation today than the static ground of their ideas in the Cold War.

    • Milton Devonair

      “the growing split in the West over more military involvement by the US.”

      What are you talking about?
      Who are you talking about?

      Your whole post seems to be nothing but vague, meaningless generalities. Sounds like something a professor would write, a professor that has never had a job, never left his comfortable government funded office and experienced the real world.

      So what EXACTLY are the answers to the above?

    • http://www.facebook.com/anthony.carl.caudill Anthony Caudill

      The devil has incarnated and world war is coming… only question is who has the advantage when the shooting starts.

  • Milton Devonair

    Italy is fearing a muslim invasion. Yet:
    “Italy has only 5,000 troops available that are even close to deployable, according to the defense ministry. Or that the military budget was cut by 40 percent two years ago, which has kept the acquisition of 90 F-35 fighter jets hanging in the balance and left the country combat-challenged to lead any mission—especially one against an enemy like the Islamic State.

    In fact, Renzi didn’t specify exactly who would wield that military might, and, two days later, when no one volunteered to lead the charge, he backtracked. “It’s not the time for a military intervention,” Renzi told an Italian television station Monday night and said the United Nations had to lead the way. “Our proposal is to wait for the UN Security Council. The strength of
    the UN is decidedly superior to that of the radical militias.”

    And other than the US, what nato countries can help Ukraine? They can’t even help themselves.
    “The UN” means ‘non nato US money/military’.

    The modern world is certainly learning a lesson in history….a history that keeps repeating itself, over and over and over and over…..

  • martin

    we sent the baltic states 100 m1 abram tanks with an effective range of 2 miles.giant military force such as the untied states takes time to move things around this is all coming into play.we are backing out of the isis issue and redirecting our focus slowly and calmly to the ukrainian situation.we are gaining massive intelligence on there weapons capabilities.the russians only threat to the united states besides nukes is the gargoyle and the growler surface to air missiles hence the deployment of the m1 abram tanks.all wars are won with air superiority first……….russian and chinese air force is a joke cant wait to see that 10 minute battle…….and to be clear united states would prefer to nuke it out on russian and European soil we have nothing to lose there……..i dont see the win here for putin it just doesnt make sense……