Ukrainian positions shelled 10 times over first five hours of ceasefire

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2015/02/15 • War in the Donbas

As of 5 am, the ceasefire agreement is holding. A total of 10 artillery strikes against the ATO positions have been reported, according to the press agency of the Office of the President.

According to information provided by the general staff of the ATO, the situation as of 5 am has been a general observance of the ceasefire and all artillery have fallen silent.

Sviatoslav Tseholko, Chief of the Press Agency for the Office of the President, has posted these details on his Facebook page.

“A total of 10 artillery strikes have been recorded against the positions being held by the Ukrainian army, including six on checkpoints in one particular raion in which are located the towns of Chornukhine and Zolote,” according to the announcement.

“Although it is too soon to reach any conclusions, if there is to be any hope of ending this war, Russia has an obligation to enact the agreement reached in Minsk,” Tseholko emphasized.

Earlier, UNIAN had reported information from the General Staff that over a four hour period of the ceasefire, the protocol of no artillery fire was generally being observed. Artillery strikes that did originate from the terrorists were haphazard, and there have been no casualties.

As stated in the Minsk accord, as of 00:00 on February 15, a state of ceasefire was to take effect. President Poroshenko issued a decree ordering the ceasefire.

Translated by: Jeffrey Stephaniuk
Source: UNIAN

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  • Michel Cloarec

    Between 0001 and 0500 that is vodka breakfast time for the dpr thugs. Or maybe it is retaliation for the following ”

    Attempt at the life of the Head of the DPR Aleksandr Zakharchenko

    on: February 14, 2015

    NEWSFLASH!!!
    Less than an hour ago three mines dropped near the residence of the Head of the DPR Aleksandr Zakharchenko. It happened minutes before that start of the press-conference at which the head of the DPR was going to explain the significance of the Minsk agreements for the Republic.
    The blasts were heard during Zakharchenko’s interview to Russian NTV channel. The mines exploded practically in 150 feet distance from the journalists who were waiting for the start of the press-conference.
    As a result of the explosions three persons died and three were wounded.”
    So there is a GPS on his bunker ! GOOD !

    • Kruton

      Death to the Bolshevik animal! God grant success to the Partisans!

  • Bynk
    • DejaVu

      Yes the European slaughterhouse especially in France and Germany. They think that because of appeasement they won peace but in reality all they won was a small breather before World War III.

  • Silencionomore

    Why on earth has Martial Law not been imposed as promised by Poroshenko!??

  • Silencionomore

    What was wrong with my previous post for it to be removed?? It was a simple enough question. ‘Why has martial law not been imposed as poroshenko said would be’?.

    ? = question!

  • Silencionomore

    Below is a report from M****w times. Even they confirm russian soldiers and their russian weapons are in Ukraine. Quite sick really.

    It is easy to see the short-term imperative of the deal agreed
    in Minsk on Feb. 12 for Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko: His troops
    have been on the retreat since New Year’s, as Russia has inserted more
    forces and equipment into eastern Ukraine.

    France, Germany and Britain have all come out against supplying
    lethal weapons to Ukraine. U.S. President Barack Obama has said only
    that if diplomacy failed he would ask his team to look at the options,
    including supplying arms. For the time being at least, there seems
    little hope of the West saving Ukraine from further Russian military
    advances.

    The Minsk agreement may give Poroshenko breathing space to focus
    on the economic and political reforms which Ukraine desperately needs.
    Also on Feb. 12, the International Monetary Fund announced that it had
    agreed a $17.5 billion loan for Ukraine, in addition to bilateral
    and multilateral loans of about $40 billion, as part of a reform
    package.

    It is harder to understand why French President Francois Hollande
    and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have conceded so much to Russia,
    following its failure to implement the previous Minsk agreement
    from last September. With Russia’s economy struggling, President
    Vladimir Putin has once again exploited the West’s weaknesses
    and disguised his own vulnerability.

    This may, in the short term, be a necessary agreement, but it is
    a bad one for Ukraine: The delay of two days before the cease-fire took
    effect gave Russian forces and their proxies time to take more
    territory.

    Monitoring such a huge area will be almost impossible for the
    Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and its team of 250
    unarmed monitors and one drone, unless the number of monitors is
    drastically increased. The chance of cease-fire violations or of heavy
    weapons systems turning up where they should not must be close to 100
    percent.

    Russian forces will keep control of the Ukrainian border in the
    separatist areas until the end of the year, and will only give it up
    when Ukraine has made constitutional changes guaranteeing the special
    status of the separatist areas.

    Presumably Russia will want to make its own judgement on whether
    the constitutional changes go far enough. Would anyone be surprised if
    Putin decided that Ukraine had not done enough to deserve
    the restoration of control over its own territory and border?

    It is also a bad deal for the rest of Europe. Hollande and Merkel are
    relying on Putin to implement this agreement in good faith. In return,
    the leaders of France and Germany are giving Putin increased influence
    in Ukraine’s domestic affairs via his puppets in the east, and a say
    in Ukraine’s economic relationship with the European Union.

    They backed talks between the EU, Russia and Ukraine on the
    implementation of the EU-Ukraine Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade
    Agreement (DCFTA).

    The DCFTA will force Ukraine to make painful reforms, but it also
    offers Ukraine the long-term prospect of a successful economy,
    integrated with the EU’s single market.

    Putin wants to block the reforms and keep Ukraine a corrupt,
    post-Soviet state dependent on Russia. If he succeeds, the lesson
    for other pro-European countries in the region will be clear: Even if
    you do the right things, we will not stand up to Russia for you.

    The Minsk agreement cannot be rolled back, but the West can mitigate
    the damage. Western sanctions against Russia must not be relaxed until
    every point in the Minsk agreement has been implemented.

    Crimea-related measures should stay as long as Russia occupies
    the peninsula. The EU should insist that the amnesty agreed between
    the parties for crimes committed in the conflict should not apply
    to those responsible for killing 298 people on the downed Malaysia
    Airlines Flight MH17.

    Above all, the West should redouble its support to Ukraine — not only
    financial and technical, but also military. It is in Europe’s interests
    that Ukraine should be the stable democracy that the Maidan protesters
    wanted it to be — and with a neighbor like Russia, that can never be
    guaranteed without robust defenses.

    The EU should let go of its illusions. It has spent two decades
    trying to develop a rules-based relationship with Russia. It is time
    to accept that its efforts have failed. Now the West has to invest
    in protecting itself and those who aspire to join it.

  • Mazepa

    …but lavrov will be next.
    Guaranteed.